engine options

Thanks for your reply Scott. I thought I had better start a new thread as I have a couple of questions for you re wbx engines. I am considering three options at present. 1. Basically copy "the better wbx" with the qsc pistons and longer rods 2. Buy a Gowesty 2.5 kit. 3. A freshen up with DJ pistons.
I have never driven any of these engines so it is very hard to choose a path. I have conserns about the reliability of the go westy 2.5 also, but refuse to pay serious coin for a low compression engine, which their smaller engines are. I have a heavy camper and while I am not conserned with overtakinging ferrari's I just need to not have to gear down to second on long climbs fully loaded. In your opinion will any of these engines fail to do that? (assuming you have driven the 2.5)Greg E
Greg,

From what I've read, the HP comes from higher compression. You will need to use higher octane fuel. I've driven a few of these but never off pavement. They are a good improvement over the stock Wasserboxer but not remarkably so in my opinion. My points of comparison are:

1.9TD AAZ
1.6TD AAZ
2.6 Inline-5 VW petrol
2.0 Inline-4 VW petrol
2.1 WBX
2.2 EJ non-turbo Subaru

I personally feel the Subie was the better option as far as cost, performance & drivability. If money and fuel economy was not an issue, I loved the feel of the five pot SA 2.6. Nothing beats the diesels for fuel economy and torque. I just hate not being able to find the gears to go faster on the highway.

Have driven many other powerplants but not in a Syncro.


BenT

sent from my electronic leash

On May 11, 2011, at 2:30 AM, "gregespo73" <gregespo73@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Thanks for your reply Scott. I thought I had better start a new thread as I have a couple of questions for you re wbx engines. I am considering three options at present. 1. Basically copy "the better wbx" with the qsc pistons and longer rods 2. Buy a Gowesty 2.5 kit. 3. A freshen up with DJ pistons.
> I have never driven any of these engines so it is very hard to choose a path. I have conserns about the reliability of the go westy 2.5 also, but refuse to pay serious coin for a low compression engine, which their smaller engines are. I have a heavy camper and while I am not conserned with overtakinging ferrari's I just need to not have to gear down to second on long climbs fully loaded. In your opinion will any of these engines fail to do that? (assuming you have driven the 2.5)Greg E
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
Thanks Ben, The most important piece of info I left out is I am commited to keeping a wbx in my syncro. Would you be able to comment on the reliability of  the 2.5 gowesty, I am thinking you would probably know someone with one. Greg E

From: BenT Syncro <syncro@gmail.com>
To: "Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, 11 May 2011 7:43 PM
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 
Greg,

From what I've read, the HP comes from higher compression. You will need to use higher octane fuel. I've driven a few of these but never off pavement. They are a good improvement over the stock Wasserboxer but not remarkably so in my opinion. My points of comparison are:

1.9TD AAZ
1.6TD AAZ
2.6 Inline-5 VW petrol
2.0 Inline-4 VW petrol
2.1 WBX
2.2 EJ non-turbo Subaru

I personally feel the Subie was the better option as far as cost, performance & drivability. If money and fuel economy was not an issue, I loved the feel of the five pot SA 2.6. Nothing beats the diesels for fuel economy and torque. I just hate not being able to find the gears to go faster on the highway.

Have driven many other powerplants but not in a Syncro.

BenT

sent from my electronic leash

On May 11, 2011, at 2:30 AM, "gregespo73" <gregespo73@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Thanks for your reply Scott. I thought I had better start a new thread as I have a couple of questions for you re wbx engines. I am considering three options at present. 1. Basically copy "the better wbx" with the qsc pistons and longer rods 2. Buy a Gowesty 2.5 kit. 3. A freshen up with DJ pistons.
> I have never driven any of these engines so it is very hard to choose a path. I have conserns about the reliability of the go westy 2.5 also, but refuse to pay serious coin for a low compression engine, which their smaller engines are. I have a heavy camper and while I am not conserned with overtakinging ferrari's I just need to not have to gear down to second on long climbs fully loaded. In your opinion will any of these engines fail to do that? (assuming you have driven the 2.5)Greg E
>
>
>
>
------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>


Hi Greg,

Unfortunately, I have only had experience with the 2.2 & 2.3 engines. I can ask around and report back to you.


BenT

sent from my electronic leash

On May 11, 2011, at 2:55 AM, greg esposito <gregespo73@yahoo.com> wrote:

Thanks Ben, The most important piece of info I left out is I am commited to keeping a wbx in my syncro. Would you be able to comment on the reliability of  the 2.5 gowesty, I am thinking you would probably know someone with one. Greg E

From: BenT Syncro <syncro@gmail.com>
To: "Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, 11 May 2011 7:43 PM
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 
Greg,

From what I've read, the HP comes from higher compression. You will need to use higher octane fuel. I've driven a few of these but never off pavement. They are a good improvement over the stock Wasserboxer but not remarkably so in my opinion. My points of comparison are:

1.9TD AAZ
1.6TD AAZ
2.6 Inline-5 VW petrol
2.0 Inline-4 VW petrol
2.1 WBX
2.2 EJ non-turbo Subaru

I personally feel the Subie was the better option as far as cost, performance & drivability. If money and fuel economy was not an issue, I loved the feel of the five pot SA 2.6. Nothing beats the diesels for fuel economy and torque. I just hate not being able to find the gears to go faster on the highway.

Have driven many other powerplants but not in a Syncro.

BenT

sent from my electronic leash

On May 11, 2011, at 2:30 AM, "gregespo73" <gregespo73@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Thanks for your reply Scott. I thought I had better start a new thread as I have a couple of questions for you re wbx engines. I am considering three options at present. 1. Basically copy "the better wbx" with the qsc pistons and longer rods 2. Buy a Gowesty 2.5 kit. 3. A freshen up with DJ pistons.
> I have never driven any of these engines so it is very hard to choose a path. I have conserns about the reliability of the go westy 2.5 also, but refuse to pay serious coin for a low compression engine, which their smaller engines are. I have a heavy camper and while I am not conserned with overtakinging ferrari's I just need to not have to gear down to second on long climbs fully loaded. In your opinion will any of these engines fail to do that? (assuming you have driven the 2.5)Greg E
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>


Hey Greg, I've got the DJ pistons in mine and I can confidently say that it it had power to spare (for a kombie)when it was fresh.Even enough for the odd overtaking manouvre. Now its 120k's down the road and in need of some more tinkering -needs a new cam for a start.I also have the Chris Corkin oil cooler -just installed it about 3 weeks ago and yes it works well.Get an extra 10psi of oil pressure out of the fairly tired wbx- should have done this mod when the engine was new.Can't think of why he puts them on that side of the engine but it fits well & was easy to install. Cheers Eddie.

--- In Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com, "gregespo73" <gregespo73@...> wrote:
>
> Thanks for your reply Scott. I thought I had better start a new thread as I have a couple of questions for you re wbx engines. I am considering three options at present. 1. Basically copy "the better wbx" with the qsc pistons and longer rods 2. Buy a Gowesty 2.5 kit. 3. A freshen up with DJ pistons.
> I have never driven any of these engines so it is very hard to choose a path. I have conserns about the reliability of the go westy 2.5 also, but refuse to pay serious coin for a low compression engine, which their smaller engines are. I have a heavy camper and while I am not conserned with overtakinging ferrari's I just need to not have to gear down to second on long climbs fully loaded. In your opinion will any of these engines fail to do that? (assuming you have driven the 2.5)Greg E
>
Greg,

Here's a great report about a GoWesty 2.3 that someone just posted on the Vanagon List.

BenT

------COPY OF BELOW------

What follows is nothing more than a routine tale of some recent work
I had done on my '84 Wolfsburg camper.  It was interesting for me,
and maybe some part of my experience will be useful to someone else.

In March, I put the camper in storage and flew to New York to visit
family for a couple of months, not realizing its California
registration was due within days of my planned return and required a
smog check!

GoWesty installed my 2.3L waterboxer engine in May, 2009, about
30,000 miles ago.

http://www.fuelly.com/driver/sbw/vanagon

Since then, one shop had a little trouble getting the GoWesty engine
set up just right, since it uses the stock air flow meter and
computer.  I didn't want any trouble with the smog check, so I made
an appointment at GoWesty for May 6, to check the tuning and then
take it to Smitty's around the corner for the smog test.

Then I realized it was due for the 30K/2-year service, so I figured
I'd have GoWesty do that at the same time:

http://www.gowesty.com/library_article.php?id=313

(GoWesty installed an overhauled transmission in November, 2009,
about 15,000 miles ago, so not all of the 30K service would be needed.)

And I thought I had a minor coolant leak: I had to add a little
coolant more often than I should, and at the last oil change, the
bottom of the engine and the oil filter were covered with a crusty
residue that I suspected was cooked coolant.  So I figured I'd ask
GoWesty to look at that, too.

Oh, and my aux battery wasn't charging.  I find the wiring diagrams
unintelligible (Has anybody converted the Bentley diagrams to
ordinary electrical schematics?), so I thought I'd let them troubleshoot that.

Normally, I'd have this work done at one of the shops in the Bay Area:

- Van Cafe in Santa Cruz
- Peninsula Automotive in Campbell
- Fred's Garage in Redwood City

I have family in Santa Cruz, and I've found Van Cafe less expensive
than GoWesty.  But I really wanted GoWesty involved in the smog test.

I returned to Oakland April 30.  The Westy fired right up.  (I had
disconnected the batteries, just in case.)  After a week of work in
the Bay Area, I headed down to GoWesty late on May 5, camped at their
shop, and handed 'em the keys first thing on Friday, May 6.

By lunchtime, the smog test was passed, and I renewed the
registration on-line with four days to spare!

Back at GoWesty, the mechanic put the camper on the lift and pointed
out a cracked exhaust pipe, the #1 & #3 pipe adjacent to the water
pump, which was leaking!  Indeed, that same crusty residue was on the
pump below the drain hole.

That water pump was installed by Van Cafe 13 months before and had
only 4,500 miles on it.  (The warranty is 12 months or 12,000
miles.)  I'm told water pumps fail more often than we'd like, but
maybe hot exhaust gases accelerated the failure?

There wasn't time to replace the exhaust pipe and water pump that
Friday, and it was safe enough to drive the camper (Who knows how
long the exhaust had been cracked?), so I decided to have them finish
the rest of the work, then drive down to Venice Beach for the
weekend.  It was nice to have the aux battery charging, finally!

On the way to GoWesty, I had driven at 60 mph and saw 21.7
mpg!  That's much better than my average of 18.8 mpg.  So I stayed at
60 mph on the way to Venice Beach.  I was surprised to see 17.9 mpg
on the first leg.

After a nice weekend at Venice Beach, I headed back to Los Osos.  The
fuel gauge was dropping much faster than I expected, so I stopped for
gas and was astonished to see 14.8 mpg!

I again camped in GoWesty's lot, then got up early to fill the gas
tank.  I was down to 12.9 mpg!

I added poor fuel economy to the list, and GoWesty got to work.  They
replaced the exhaust pipe and water pump.  And they determined the
oxygen sensor had failed just hours after the successful smog
check!  What are the chances?

https://twitter.com/sbwsty

By mid-afternoon, I was back on the road to the Bay Area.  Arriving
in Santa Cruz, after 3.5 hours slogging along at 60 mph in very
strong crosswinds, I filled the tank and calculated 17.8 mpg.  That's
a typical number for unfavorable conditions.

Tuesday morning, I stopped by Van Cafe to show them the failed water
pump.  They surprised me by offering partial store credit for the
pump, which I'll probably apply to some H4 headlights.

The total bill at GoWesty was around $1,500.  That's more than I wish
it was, but I've found they stand by their work.  I'm not disappointed.

Now, if I could just get the Propex heater to light!

------ END OF COPY-------
Hi,
  I have driven a Chris Corkn' 2.2 better waterboxer'  engine ..
though not a lot.  I was basically impressed though.
 
I have driven a gowestyh 2.5 about a half mile ..
couldn't really evaluate it.
 
I have work on and driven a gowesty 2.3 built on a 1.9 case.
That van's owner had a real go-around with that engine ..
leaking head gaksets within a year ..
then a long saga of people who didn't know quite what they were doing working on it.
At one point it had a tapping noises ..
took a long time for people to figure that out, but the larger bore needed narrower metal rings at the top of the barrels, and someone put in stock ones......as I understand it...resulting in pistons just touching the metal ring, evidently.
  so that one 'should  have' been ok....but it was a real issue for well over a year for the owner.
 
the basic ideal of larger displacement wbxr engine is all right ..'sort of' .
oh...some of these gowesty engines are suppossed to take premium fuel.
Which I never recommend and don't like paying for.
I say run regular as long as it doesn't ping, or mid-grade if you want a bit more octane.
don't know what you petrol is ..
here Unleaded Regular is 87 Octane and up to 10 % ethanol.
It works well enough is about all I can say.
 
Don't know what you mean by 'low compression' ..
you mean low compression ratio ?
what's normal for a waterboxer ...about 8.5 to One I'd imagine.
 
without things like a knock sensor I wouldn't want over a 9 to 1 CR myself..
higher CR may require more expensive higher octane fuel to run..
 
and one time, in the 70's, I put low compression pistons in a 65 VW Bus ..
maybe a 1500 engine.
That van would pull steep hills at 20 mph in 3rd gear, I swear.
Had huge pulling power at low rpm. 
 
so I would say if low speed crawling in going to be done sometimes. ..
or you just want 'torque' at mid-rpm ..then you do not want a high strung high compression ratio engine very much.
 
I consider doing a long grade with a big load...
if you can do that at about 50mph in 3rd..
that's quite acceptible.
There is a steep long hill out of the valley where I am ..
gains near 3,000 ft in altitude over 8 miles or so.
Last summer..
I was driving an 85 2WD T3 camper van with a 1.9 wbxr engine and a pretty good load ..
I did spend a long time in 2nd gear at 35 mph ..
not acceptible to me.
I have a freind with a 90 2WD ( both vans manual trans ) GL T3 van, 2.1 wbxr ....
I knew he probably did that whole hill, lightly loaed, in 3rd gear at 50ish ..
when I saw him,.....he confirmed that's what that van did on that grade.
 
so you do want some good oomph in whatever engine you engine up with.
I sure would not push displacement too far in a waterboxer myself.
 
chris corken btw..
that engine I put together idled all right ..
but it didn' respond to the air bypass screw on the throttle body very much ....to adjust idle rpm.
That whole van was an awful mess.....from one end to the other ..
so it's possible that throttle body was wonky ...ever last single other part on that Syncro van was.
Chris told me ...'vw uses a cam that idles better than the one I use' ..
so he might have a higher lift cam in them ..
or more valve timing overlap ..
and ...
I generally do not like aftermarket or performance cams..
because 'usually' the stock cam grind is the best compromise between good low end power, and some decent top end power.
the waterboxer torque curve is so flat, it's awful.
power is very much the same whether at 2,800 rom or 4,200 rpm..
they feel and sound exactly the same at those two rpm's..
it's even easy to forget to shift up to top gear sometimes..
since the engine sounds and feels like you did alreadly..
so 'that' I would sure want to fix in a full custom rebuild.
 
wish I could have driven Chris's 2.2 more ..
it had a fancy exahsut system on it ..
probalby ran really well.
It also had ...
this is really neat .. an electro-pneumatic throttle switch on it ..
solid state, reads intake manifold vacuum/pressure  to tell the ecu the engine is at idle or WOT.
 The stock switches..
I have to fix those all the time ..
almost all T3 vans I work on with waterboxer engines have the throttle switch not making contact, and the timing too advanced.   And moving from a mechanical switch to a solid state on ( I think it is ) ..
has to be a big improvement.
 
too long already !
Scott
 
 
 
----- Original Message -----
From: gregespo73
Sent: Wednesday, May 11, 2011 2:30 AM
Subject: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 

Thanks for your reply Scott. I thought I had better start a new thread as I have a couple of questions for you re wbx engines. I am considering three options at present. 1. Basically copy "the better wbx" with the qsc pistons and longer rods 2. Buy a Gowesty 2.5 kit. 3. A freshen up with DJ pistons.
I have never driven any of these engines so it is very hard to choose a path. I have conserns about the reliability of the go westy 2.5 also, but refuse to pay serious coin for a low compression engine, which their smaller engines are. I have a heavy camper and while I am not conserned with overtakinging ferrari's I just need to not have to gear down to second on long climbs fully loaded. In your opinion will any of these engines fail to do that? (assuming you have driven the 2.5)Greg E

good post Ben.
minor picky point..
re
1.6TD AAZ
 
the engine code for a 1.6 TD isn't  'AAZ' ..
 
it's some other two letter code.
they're 60 hp and 90 ft lbs or torque, something like that ..I have it on a chart somewhere,
and while VW put that engine in their Syncro vans ( JX code .....that is a european factory 1.6 TD engine in a T3 van ....slightly different - much better mid-range torque - than the 1.6 TD's from jettas and golfs we see here in the US )
 anyway ...a 1.6 TD   will barely cut it in a Synro Van.
 
I'm not nutty about TDI engines ..
but my understanding is that they'll climb just anything at very low speed, at idle even, in a good syncro van.  Tons of low end grunt in those engines. If you don't mind it being a diesel.
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, May 11, 2011 2:43 AM
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 

Greg,

From what I've read, the HP comes from higher compression. You will need to use higher octane fuel. I've driven a few of these but never off pavement. They are a good improvement over the stock Wasserboxer but not remarkably so in my opinion. My points of comparison are:

1.9TD AAZ
1.6TD AAZ
2.6 Inline-5 VW petrol
2.0 Inline-4 VW petrol
2.1 WBX
2.2 EJ non-turbo Subaru

I personally feel the Subie was the better option as far as cost, performance & drivability. If money and fuel economy was not an issue, I loved the feel of the five pot SA 2.6. Nothing beats the diesels for fuel economy and torque. I just hate not being able to find the gears to go faster on the highway.

Have driven many other powerplants but not in a Syncro.

BenT

sent from my electronic leash

On May 11, 2011, at 2:30 AM, "gregespo73" <gregespo73@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Thanks for your reply Scott. I thought I had better start a new thread as I have a couple of questions for you re wbx engines. I am considering three options at present. 1. Basically copy "the better wbx" with the qsc pistons and longer rods 2. Buy a Gowesty 2.5 kit. 3. A freshen up with DJ pistons.
> I have never driven any of these engines so it is very hard to choose a path. I have conserns about the reliability of the go westy 2.5 also, but refuse to pay serious coin for a low compression engine, which their smaller engines are. I have a heavy camper and while I am not conserned with overtakinging ferrari's I just need to not have to gear down to second on long climbs fully loaded. In your opinion will any of these engines fail to do that? (assuming you have driven the 2.5)Greg E
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>

Yeah JX.

BenT

sent from my electronic leash

On May 11, 2011, at 2:22 PM, "Scott Daniel  - Turbovans" <ScottDaniel@turbovans.com> wrote:

good post Ben.
minor picky point..
re
1.6TD AAZ
 
the engine code for a 1.6 TD isn't  'AAZ' ..
 
it's some other two letter code.
they're 60 hp and 90 ft lbs or torque, something like that ..I have it on a chart somewhere,
and while VW put that engine in their Syncro vans ( JX code .....that is a european factory 1.6 TD engine in a T3 van ....slightly different - much better mid-range torque - than the 1.6 TD's from jettas and golfs we see here in the US )
 anyway ...a 1.6 TD   will barely cut it in a Synro Van.
 
I'm not nutty about TDI engines ..
but my understanding is that they'll climb just anything at very low speed, at idle even, in a good syncro van.  Tons of low end grunt in those engines. If you don't mind it being a diesel.
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, May 11, 2011 2:43 AM
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 

Greg,

From what I've read, the HP comes from higher compression. You will need to use higher octane fuel. I've driven a few of these but never off pavement. They are a good improvement over the stock Wasserboxer but not remarkably so in my opinion. My points of comparison are:

1.9TD AAZ
1.6TD AAZ
2.6 Inline-5 VW petrol
2.0 Inline-4 VW petrol
2.1 WBX
2.2 EJ non-turbo Subaru

I personally feel the Subie was the better option as far as cost, performance & drivability. If money and fuel economy was not an issue, I loved the feel of the five pot SA 2.6. Nothing beats the diesels for fuel economy and torque. I just hate not being able to find the gears to go faster on the highway.

Have driven many other powerplants but not in a Syncro.

BenT

sent from my electronic leash

On May 11, 2011, at 2:30 AM, "gregespo73" <gregespo73@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Thanks for your reply Scott. I thought I had better start a new thread as I have a couple of questions for you re wbx engines. I am considering three options at present. 1. Basically copy "the better wbx" with the qsc pistons and longer rods 2. Buy a Gowesty 2.5 kit. 3. A freshen up with DJ pistons.
> I have never driven any of these engines so it is very hard to choose a path. I have conserns about the reliability of the go westy 2.5 also, but refuse to pay serious coin for a low compression engine, which their smaller engines are. I have a heavy camper and while I am not conserned with overtakinging ferrari's I just need to not have to gear down to second on long climbs fully loaded. In your opinion will any of these engines fail to do that? (assuming you have driven the 2.5)Greg E
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>

Thanks Ben and Eddie, Anyone have a source for DJ pistons? It would be the easiest option but I am not convinced it would be enough power for a heavy camper. The frustrating thing is that there is so much performance gear for aircooled vw's, some type 1 parts fit but the reciprocating mass is different. Greg E

--- In Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com, BenT Syncro <syncro@...> wrote:
>
> Greg,
>
> Here's a great report about a GoWesty 2.3 that someone just posted on the Vanagon List.
>
> BenT
>
> ------COPY OF BELOW------
>
> What follows is nothing more than a routine tale of some recent work
> I had done on my '84 Wolfsburg camper. It was interesting for me,
> and maybe some part of my experience will be useful to someone else.
>
> In March, I put the camper in storage and flew to New York to visit
> family for a couple of months, not realizing its California
> registration was due within days of my planned return and required a
> smog check!
>
> GoWesty installed my 2.3L waterboxer engine in May, 2009, about
> 30,000 miles ago.
>
> http://www.fuelly.com/driver/sbw/vanagon
>
> Since then, one shop had a little trouble getting the GoWesty engine
> set up just right, since it uses the stock air flow meter and
> computer. I didn't want any trouble with the smog check, so I made
> an appointment at GoWesty for May 6, to check the tuning and then
> take it to Smitty's around the corner for the smog test.
>
> Then I realized it was due for the 30K/2-year service, so I figured
> I'd have GoWesty do that at the same time:
>
> http://www.gowesty.com/library_article.php?id=313
>
> (GoWesty installed an overhauled transmission in November, 2009,
> about 15,000 miles ago, so not all of the 30K service would be needed.)
>
> And I thought I had a minor coolant leak: I had to add a little
> coolant more often than I should, and at the last oil change, the
> bottom of the engine and the oil filter were covered with a crusty
> residue that I suspected was cooked coolant. So I figured I'd ask
> GoWesty to look at that, too.
>
> Oh, and my aux battery wasn't charging. I find the wiring diagrams
> unintelligible (Has anybody converted the Bentley diagrams to
> ordinary electrical schematics?), so I thought I'd let them troubleshoot that.
>
> Normally, I'd have this work done at one of the shops in the Bay Area:
>
> - Van Cafe in Santa Cruz
> - Peninsula Automotive in Campbell
> - Fred's Garage in Redwood City
>
> I have family in Santa Cruz, and I've found Van Cafe less expensive
> than GoWesty. But I really wanted GoWesty involved in the smog test.
>
> I returned to Oakland April 30. The Westy fired right up. (I had
> disconnected the batteries, just in case.) After a week of work in
> the Bay Area, I headed down to GoWesty late on May 5, camped at their
> shop, and handed 'em the keys first thing on Friday, May 6.
>
> By lunchtime, the smog test was passed, and I renewed the
> registration on-line with four days to spare!
>
> Back at GoWesty, the mechanic put the camper on the lift and pointed
> out a cracked exhaust pipe, the #1 & #3 pipe adjacent to the water
> pump, which was leaking! Indeed, that same crusty residue was on the
> pump below the drain hole.
>
> That water pump was installed by Van Cafe 13 months before and had
> only 4,500 miles on it. (The warranty is 12 months or 12,000
> miles.) I'm told water pumps fail more often than we'd like, but
> maybe hot exhaust gases accelerated the failure?
>
> There wasn't time to replace the exhaust pipe and water pump that
> Friday, and it was safe enough to drive the camper (Who knows how
> long the exhaust had been cracked?), so I decided to have them finish
> the rest of the work, then drive down to Venice Beach for the
> weekend. It was nice to have the aux battery charging, finally!
>
> On the way to GoWesty, I had driven at 60 mph and saw 21.7
> mpg! That's much better than my average of 18.8 mpg. So I stayed at
> 60 mph on the way to Venice Beach. I was surprised to see 17.9 mpg
> on the first leg.
>
> After a nice weekend at Venice Beach, I headed back to Los Osos. The
> fuel gauge was dropping much faster than I expected, so I stopped for
> gas and was astonished to see 14.8 mpg!
>
> I again camped in GoWesty's lot, then got up early to fill the gas
> tank. I was down to 12.9 mpg!
>
> I added poor fuel economy to the list, and GoWesty got to work. They
> replaced the exhaust pipe and water pump. And they determined the
> oxygen sensor had failed just hours after the successful smog
> check! What are the chances?
>
> https://twitter.com/sbwsty
>
> By mid-afternoon, I was back on the road to the Bay Area. Arriving
> in Santa Cruz, after 3.5 hours slogging along at 60 mph in very
> strong crosswinds, I filled the tank and calculated 17.8 mpg. That's
> a typical number for unfavorable conditions.
>
> Tuesday morning, I stopped by Van Cafe to show them the failed water
> pump. They surprised me by offering partial store credit for the
> pump, which I'll probably apply to some H4 headlights.
>
> The total bill at GoWesty was around $1,500. That's more than I wish
> it was, but I've found they stand by their work. I'm not disappointed.
>
> Now, if I could just get the Propex heater to light!
>
> ------ END OF COPY-------
> >
>
My Syncro 16 with a factory installed 1.6TD JX engine with 6.17 gears had no problem running 65-75mph. It was even able to pull a tree stump 8" in diameter from my yard while is 'G' gear. The trouble starts on even modest hills. A judicious use of the left foot is needed in advance of any decent grade. As many diesel owners will tell you, EGT (exhaust gas temps) is your enemy. EGT climbs as you ascent due to added fuel. I do not have this problem as bad on the 1.9TD which replaced the 1.6TD.

But JX or AAZ is immaterial as Greg has expressed he is committed to the WBX. I won't fault you for that choice as it would be my first choice to preserve future collector value (if that's important to you). Same reason why I went to a 1.9TD instead of TDI. But Greg, let me leave you with this thought. The person who was in charge of BMW's powertrain division responsible for the twin turbo six, VANOS variable valve timing and now project manager for BMW's hybrid division, installed a Subaru 3.3 SVX engine in his Syncro. This from a man who makes very serious engineering decisions.


BenT

sent from my electronic leash

On May 11, 2011, at 2:22 PM, "Scott Daniel  - Turbovans" <ScottDaniel@turbovans.com> wrote:

good post Ben.
minor picky point..
re
1.6TD AAZ
 
the engine code for a 1.6 TD isn't  'AAZ' ..
 
it's some other two letter code.
they're 60 hp and 90 ft lbs or torque, something like that ..I have it on a chart somewhere,
and while VW put that engine in their Syncro vans ( JX code .....that is a european factory 1.6 TD engine in a T3 van ....slightly different - much better mid-range torque - than the 1.6 TD's from jettas and golfs we see here in the US )
 anyway ...a 1.6 TD   will barely cut it in a Synro Van.
 
I'm not nutty about TDI engines ..
but my understanding is that they'll climb just anything at very low speed, at idle even, in a good syncro van.  Tons of low end grunt in those engines. If you don't mind it being a diesel.
 
----- 
Hi Greg, I think my pistons came from Tooley imports(can't be sure ,my mechanic sourced them), but I think you can't go wrong if your going to copy Cris Corkins design. Have seen those QSC piston and jug sets on the samba for around $300 -DJ's are gonna cost $800 plus.Btw my bus huals about 800 to 1000 kgs of tools and timber all the time .I don't know what sort of weight a heavy camper carries but I think i'm pretty close. One other point I have to make is that a fresh standard well sorted Wbx is going to be a lot better than your current (tired?)engine.I've got a sweet, standard spec 2.1 in my 2wd which will hold 110kph on just about every hill between here and Sydney, fully loaded whith a luggage carrier on top.I think alot depends on how well it is put together.Cheers Eddie.

--- In Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com, "gregespo73" <gregespo73@...> wrote:
>
> Thanks Ben and Eddie, Anyone have a source for DJ pistons? It would be the easiest option but I am not convinced it would be enough power for a heavy camper. The frustrating thing is that there is so much performance gear for aircooled vw's, some type 1 parts fit but the reciprocating mass is different. Greg E
>
> --- In Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com, BenT Syncro <syncro@> wrote:
> >
> > Greg,
> >
> > Here's a great report about a GoWesty 2.3 that someone just posted on the Vanagon List.
> >
> > BenT
> >
> > ------COPY OF BELOW------
> >
> > What follows is nothing more than a routine tale of some recent work
> > I had done on my '84 Wolfsburg camper. It was interesting for me,
> > and maybe some part of my experience will be useful to someone else.
> >
> > In March, I put the camper in storage and flew to New York to visit
> > family for a couple of months, not realizing its California
> > registration was due within days of my planned return and required a
> > smog check!
> >
> > GoWesty installed my 2.3L waterboxer engine in May, 2009, about
> > 30,000 miles ago.
> >
> > http://www.fuelly.com/driver/sbw/vanagon
> >
> > Since then, one shop had a little trouble getting the GoWesty engine
> > set up just right, since it uses the stock air flow meter and
> > computer. I didn't want any trouble with the smog check, so I made
> > an appointment at GoWesty for May 6, to check the tuning and then
> > take it to Smitty's around the corner for the smog test.
> >
> > Then I realized it was due for the 30K/2-year service, so I figured
> > I'd have GoWesty do that at the same time:
> >
> > http://www.gowesty.com/library_article.php?id=313
> >
> > (GoWesty installed an overhauled transmission in November, 2009,
> > about 15,000 miles ago, so not all of the 30K service would be needed.)
> >
> > And I thought I had a minor coolant leak: I had to add a little
> > coolant more often than I should, and at the last oil change, the
> > bottom of the engine and the oil filter were covered with a crusty
> > residue that I suspected was cooked coolant. So I figured I'd ask
> > GoWesty to look at that, too.
> >
> > Oh, and my aux battery wasn't charging. I find the wiring diagrams
> > unintelligible (Has anybody converted the Bentley diagrams to
> > ordinary electrical schematics?), so I thought I'd let them troubleshoot that.
> >
> > Normally, I'd have this work done at one of the shops in the Bay Area:
> >
> > - Van Cafe in Santa Cruz
> > - Peninsula Automotive in Campbell
> > - Fred's Garage in Redwood City
> >
> > I have family in Santa Cruz, and I've found Van Cafe less expensive
> > than GoWesty. But I really wanted GoWesty involved in the smog test.
> >
> > I returned to Oakland April 30. The Westy fired right up. (I had
> > disconnected the batteries, just in case.) After a week of work in
> > the Bay Area, I headed down to GoWesty late on May 5, camped at their
> > shop, and handed 'em the keys first thing on Friday, May 6.
> >
> > By lunchtime, the smog test was passed, and I renewed the
> > registration on-line with four days to spare!
> >
> > Back at GoWesty, the mechanic put the camper on the lift and pointed
> > out a cracked exhaust pipe, the #1 & #3 pipe adjacent to the water
> > pump, which was leaking! Indeed, that same crusty residue was on the
> > pump below the drain hole.
> >
> > That water pump was installed by Van Cafe 13 months before and had
> > only 4,500 miles on it. (The warranty is 12 months or 12,000
> > miles.) I'm told water pumps fail more often than we'd like, but
> > maybe hot exhaust gases accelerated the failure?
> >
> > There wasn't time to replace the exhaust pipe and water pump that
> > Friday, and it was safe enough to drive the camper (Who knows how
> > long the exhaust had been cracked?), so I decided to have them finish
> > the rest of the work, then drive down to Venice Beach for the
> > weekend. It was nice to have the aux battery charging, finally!
> >
> > On the way to GoWesty, I had driven at 60 mph and saw 21.7
> > mpg! That's much better than my average of 18.8 mpg. So I stayed at
> > 60 mph on the way to Venice Beach. I was surprised to see 17.9 mpg
> > on the first leg.
> >
> > After a nice weekend at Venice Beach, I headed back to Los Osos. The
> > fuel gauge was dropping much faster than I expected, so I stopped for
> > gas and was astonished to see 14.8 mpg!
> >
> > I again camped in GoWesty's lot, then got up early to fill the gas
> > tank. I was down to 12.9 mpg!
> >
> > I added poor fuel economy to the list, and GoWesty got to work. They
> > replaced the exhaust pipe and water pump. And they determined the
> > oxygen sensor had failed just hours after the successful smog
> > check! What are the chances?
> >
> > https://twitter.com/sbwsty
> >
> > By mid-afternoon, I was back on the road to the Bay Area. Arriving
> > in Santa Cruz, after 3.5 hours slogging along at 60 mph in very
> > strong crosswinds, I filled the tank and calculated 17.8 mpg. That's
> > a typical number for unfavorable conditions.
> >
> > Tuesday morning, I stopped by Van Cafe to show them the failed water
> > pump. They surprised me by offering partial store credit for the
> > pump, which I'll probably apply to some H4 headlights.
> >
> > The total bill at GoWesty was around $1,500. That's more than I wish
> > it was, but I've found they stand by their work. I'm not disappointed.
> >
> > Now, if I could just get the Propex heater to light!
> >
> > ------ END OF COPY-------
> > >
> >
>
Greg,

Try Patrik at www.VW-tristar.com. He deals with a lot of Tristars in Sweden where they got a lot of 112i engines which IIRC used the DJ pistons.



BenT

sent from my electronic leash

On May 11, 2011, at 2:44 PM, "gregespo73" <gregespo73@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Thanks Ben and Eddie, Anyone have a source for DJ pistons? It would be the easiest option but I am not convinced it would be enough power for a heavy camper. The frustrating thing is that there is so much performance gear for aircooled vw's, some type 1 parts fit but the reciprocating mass is different. Greg E
>
> --- In Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com, BenT Syncro <syncro@...> wrote:
>>
>> Greg,
>>
>> Here's a great report about a GoWesty 2.3 that someone just posted on the Vanagon List.
>>
>> BenT
>>
>> ------COPY OF BELOW------
>>
>> What follows is nothing more than a routine tale of some recent work
>> I had done on my '84 Wolfsburg camper. It was interesting for me,
>> and maybe some part of my experience will be useful to someone else.
>>
>> In March, I put the camper in storage and flew to New York to visit
>> family for a couple of months, not realizing its California
>> registration was due within days of my planned return and required a
>> smog check!
>>
>> GoWesty installed my 2.3L waterboxer engine in May, 2009, about
>> 30,000 miles ago.
>>
>> http://www.fuelly.com/driver/sbw/vanagon
>>
>> Since then, one shop had a little trouble getting the GoWesty engine
>> set up just right, since it uses the stock air flow meter and
>> computer. I didn't want any trouble with the smog check, so I made
>> an appointment at GoWesty for May 6, to check the tuning and then
>> take it to Smitty's around the corner for the smog test.
>>
>> Then I realized it was due for the 30K/2-year service, so I figured
>> I'd have GoWesty do that at the same time:
>>
>> http://www.gowesty.com/library_article.php?id=313
>>
>> (GoWesty installed an overhauled transmission in November, 2009,
>> about 15,000 miles ago, so not all of the 30K service would be needed.)
>>
>> And I thought I had a minor coolant leak: I had to add a little
>> coolant more often than I should, and at the last oil change, the
>> bottom of the engine and the oil filter were covered with a crusty
>> residue that I suspected was cooked coolant. So I figured I'd ask
>> GoWesty to look at that, too.
>>
>> Oh, and my aux battery wasn't charging. I find the wiring diagrams
>> unintelligible (Has anybody converted the Bentley diagrams to
>> ordinary electrical schematics?), so I thought I'd let them troubleshoot that.
>>
>> Normally, I'd have this work done at one of the shops in the Bay Area:
>>
>> - Van Cafe in Santa Cruz
>> - Peninsula Automotive in Campbell
>> - Fred's Garage in Redwood City
>>
>> I have family in Santa Cruz, and I've found Van Cafe less expensive
>> than GoWesty. But I really wanted GoWesty involved in the smog test.
>>
>> I returned to Oakland April 30. The Westy fired right up. (I had
>> disconnected the batteries, just in case.) After a week of work in
>> the Bay Area, I headed down to GoWesty late on May 5, camped at their
>> shop, and handed 'em the keys first thing on Friday, May 6.
>>
>> By lunchtime, the smog test was passed, and I renewed the
>> registration on-line with four days to spare!
>>
>> Back at GoWesty, the mechanic put the camper on the lift and pointed
>> out a cracked exhaust pipe, the #1 & #3 pipe adjacent to the water
>> pump, which was leaking! Indeed, that same crusty residue was on the
>> pump below the drain hole.
>>
>> That water pump was installed by Van Cafe 13 months before and had
>> only 4,500 miles on it. (The warranty is 12 months or 12,000
>> miles.) I'm told water pumps fail more often than we'd like, but
>> maybe hot exhaust gases accelerated the failure?
>>
>> There wasn't time to replace the exhaust pipe and water pump that
>> Friday, and it was safe enough to drive the camper (Who knows how
>> long the exhaust had been cracked?), so I decided to have them finish
>> the rest of the work, then drive down to Venice Beach for the
>> weekend. It was nice to have the aux battery charging, finally!
>>
>> On the way to GoWesty, I had driven at 60 mph and saw 21.7
>> mpg! That's much better than my average of 18.8 mpg. So I stayed at
>> 60 mph on the way to Venice Beach. I was surprised to see 17.9 mpg
>> on the first leg.
>>
>> After a nice weekend at Venice Beach, I headed back to Los Osos. The
>> fuel gauge was dropping much faster than I expected, so I stopped for
>> gas and was astonished to see 14.8 mpg!
>>
>> I again camped in GoWesty's lot, then got up early to fill the gas
>> tank. I was down to 12.9 mpg!
>>
>> I added poor fuel economy to the list, and GoWesty got to work. They
>> replaced the exhaust pipe and water pump. And they determined the
>> oxygen sensor had failed just hours after the successful smog
>> check! What are the chances?
>>
>> https://twitter.com/sbwsty
>>
>> By mid-afternoon, I was back on the road to the Bay Area. Arriving
>> in Santa Cruz, after 3.5 hours slogging along at 60 mph in very
>> strong crosswinds, I filled the tank and calculated 17.8 mpg. That's
>> a typical number for unfavorable conditions.
>>
>> Tuesday morning, I stopped by Van Cafe to show them the failed water
>> pump. They surprised me by offering partial store credit for the
>> pump, which I'll probably apply to some H4 headlights.
>>
>> The total bill at GoWesty was around $1,500. That's more than I wish
>> it was, but I've found they stand by their work. I'm not disappointed.
>>
>> Now, if I could just get the Propex heater to light!
>>
>> ------ END OF COPY-------
>>>
>>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
Ben, as someone who has been knee deep in BMW vanos and had to replace twin turbos on a 3 series I can understand why he put a subaru engine in and not a BMW!!! Bmw's biggest problem is not this mans engineering ability but their CBS (condition based servicing) system. Those valve trains have tiny ports and filters everywhere and then they allow an engine to do 30,000kms between service! There is often serious sludge in the engine at the first service. I am not anti subaru, in fact I love their product. My van still has its original engine and as far as I can tell has not had a rocker cover off. If the van was rough I would love to do the cut out arch, fire breathing thing but not on this bus. The one massive hurdel, as I see it, with big engines in these vans is the gearbox. In time the parts suppliers will see a gap in the market as gowesty did and start making high comp p&l sets, stroked rods and cranks. Greg E

From: BenT Syncro <syncro@gmail.com>
To: "Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, 12 May 2011 7:49 AM
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 
My Syncro 16 with a factory installed 1.6TD JX engine with 6.17 gears had no problem running 65-75mph. It was even able to pull a tree stump 8" in diameter from my yard while is 'G' gear. The trouble starts on even modest hills. A judicious use of the left foot is needed in advance of any decent grade. As many diesel owners will tell you, EGT (exhaust gas temps) is your enemy. EGT climbs as you ascent due to added fuel. I do not have this problem as bad on the 1.9TD which replaced the 1.6TD.

But JX or AAZ is immaterial as Greg has expressed he is committed to the WBX. I won't fault you for that choice as it would be my first choice to preserve future collector value (if that's important to you). Same reason why I went to a 1.9TD instead of TDI. But Greg, let me leave you with this thought. The person who was in charge of BMW's powertrain division responsible for the twin turbo six, VANOS variable valve timing and now project manager for BMW's hybrid division, installed a Subaru 3.3 SVX engine in his Syncro. This from a man who makes very serious engineering decisions.


BenT

sent from my electronic leash

On May 11, 2011, at 2:22 PM, "Scott Daniel  - Turbovans" <ScottDaniel@turbovans.com> wrote:

good post Ben.
minor picky point..
re
1.6TD AAZ
 
the engine code for a 1.6 TD isn't  'AAZ' ..
 
it's some other two letter code.
they're 60 hp and 90 ft lbs or torque, something like that ..I have it on a chart somewhere,
and while VW put that engine in their Syncro vans ( JX code .....that is a european factory 1.6 TD engine in a T3 van ....slightly different - much better mid-range torque - than the 1.6 TD's from jettas and golfs we see here in the US )
 anyway ...a 1.6 TD   will barely cut it in a Synro Van.
 
I'm not nutty about TDI engines ..
but my understanding is that they'll climb just anything at very low speed, at idle even, in a good syncro van.  Tons of low end grunt in those engines. If you don't mind it being a diesel.
 
----- 


Hey Scott, min octane in Aus is 91ron, then 95ron and 98ron are available. Ethonl is optional. I find a good improvement in power and fuel economy by using 95. Yes by low compression I was talking compression ratio. Mv is around eight and half and I think DJ is around ten. Big differance. High octane is everywhere in Aus now, even in the outback. But if stuck you could have a bottle of octane booster for emergencies. I haven't heard horrier stories about pinging with DJ's on digifant. Greg E

From: Scott Daniel - Turbovans <ScottDaniel@turbovans.com>
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, 12 May 2011 7:16 AM
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 
Hi,
  I have driven a Chris Corkn' 2.2 better waterboxer'  engine ..
though not a lot.  I was basically impressed though.
 
I have driven a gowestyh 2.5 about a half mile ..
couldn't really evaluate it.
 
I have work on and driven a gowesty 2.3 built on a 1.9 case.
That van's owner had a real go-around with that engine ..
leaking head gaksets within a year ..
then a long saga of people who didn't know quite what they were doing working on it.
At one point it had a tapping noises ..
took a long time for people to figure that out, but the larger bore needed narrower metal rings at the top of the barrels, and someone put in stock ones......as I understand it...resulting in pistons just touching the metal ring, evidently.
  so that one 'should  have' been ok....but it was a real issue for well over a year for the owner.
 
the basic ideal of larger displacement wbxr engine is all right ..'sort of' .
oh...some of these gowesty engines are suppossed to take premium fuel.
Which I never recommend and don't like paying for.
I say run regular as long as it doesn't ping, or mid-grade if you want a bit more octane.
don't know what you petrol is ..
here Unleaded Regular is 87 Octane and up to 10 % ethanol.
It works well enough is about all I can say.
 
Don't know what you mean by 'low compression' ..
you mean low compression ratio ?
what's normal for a waterboxer ...about 8.5 to One I'd imagine.
 
without things like a knock sensor I wouldn't want over a 9 to 1 CR myself..
higher CR may require more expensive higher octane fuel to run..
 
and one time, in the 70's, I put low compression pistons in a 65 VW Bus ..
maybe a 1500 engine.
That van would pull steep hills at 20 mph in 3rd gear, I swear.
Had huge pulling power at low rpm. 
 
so I would say if low speed crawling in going to be done sometimes. ..
or you just want 'torque' at mid-rpm ..then you do not want a high strung high compression ratio engine very much.
 
I consider doing a long grade with a big load...
if you can do that at about 50mph in 3rd..
that's quite acceptible.
There is a steep long hill out of the valley where I am ..
gains near 3,000 ft in altitude over 8 miles or so.
Last summer..
I was driving an 85 2WD T3 camper van with a 1.9 wbxr engine and a pretty good load ..
I did spend a long time in 2nd gear at 35 mph ..
not acceptible to me.
I have a freind with a 90 2WD ( both vans manual trans ) GL T3 van, 2.1 wbxr ....
I knew he probably did that whole hill, lightly loaed, in 3rd gear at 50ish ..
when I saw him,.....he confirmed that's what that van did on that grade.
 
so you do want some good oomph in whatever engine you engine up with.
I sure would not push displacement too far in a waterboxer myself.
 
chris corken btw..
that engine I put together idled all right ..
but it didn' respond to the air bypass screw on the throttle body very much ....to adjust idle rpm.
That whole van was an awful mess.....from one end to the other ..
so it's possible that throttle body was wonky ...ever last single other part on that Syncro van was.
Chris told me ...'vw uses a cam that idles better than the one I use' ..
so he might have a higher lift cam in them ..
or more valve timing overlap ..
and ...
I generally do not like aftermarket or performance cams..
because 'usually' the stock cam grind is the best compromise between good low end power, and some decent top end power.
the waterboxer torque curve is so flat, it's awful.
power is very much the same whether at 2,800 rom or 4,200 rpm..
they feel and sound exactly the same at those two rpm's..
it's even easy to forget to shift up to top gear sometimes..
since the engine sounds and feels like you did alreadly..
so 'that' I would sure want to fix in a full custom rebuild.
 
wish I could have driven Chris's 2.2 more ..
it had a fancy exahsut system on it ..
probalby ran really well.
It also had ...
this is really neat .. an electro-pneumatic throttle switch on it ..
solid state, reads intake manifold vacuum/pressure  to tell the ecu the engine is at idle or WOT.
 The stock switches..
I have to fix those all the time ..
almost all T3 vans I work on with waterboxer engines have the throttle switch not making contact, and the timing too advanced.   And moving from a mechanical switch to a solid state on ( I think it is ) ..
has to be a big improvement.
 
too long already !
Scott
 
 
 
----- Original Message -----
From: gregespo73
Sent: Wednesday, May 11, 2011 2:30 AM
Subject: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 
Thanks for your reply Scott. I thought I had better start a new thread as I have a couple of questions for you re wbx engines. I am considering three options at present. 1. Basically copy "the better wbx" with the qsc pistons and longer rods 2. Buy a Gowesty 2.5 kit. 3. A freshen up with DJ pistons.
I have never driven any of these engines so it is very hard to choose a path. I have conserns about the reliability of the go westy 2.5 also, but refuse to pay serious coin for a low compression engine, which their smaller engines are. I have a heavy camper and while I am not conserned with overtakinging ferrari's I just need to not have to gear down to second on long climbs fully loaded. In your opinion will any of these engines fail to do that? (assuming you have driven the 2.5)Greg E



Greg,

The VW 1.8T engines from the same malady. The reason for not putting a BMW engine is packaging and cost. Most BMW sixers are too long. The Syncro transaxle is also not known for liking more than 200hp put through it's teeth.

Larger piston and liner sets have been available before Lucas & Co. at GoWesty got their hands dirty with them. I had a supplier here who had a 40-foot container load of those pistons which were sold wholesale to US shops. It's been a few years but I could ask for you, if you like. It is my understanding that GW has switched to a domestically manufactured piston for various reasons.

I seem to recall there were clearance issues with the larger pistons and at some point, the vendor started selling them with relief pockets for valves. I don't remember the whole story anymore as this was years ago. Most retailers moved away from the 'big bore & stroker engines' as less expensive and more reliable alternatives presented themselves in the form of alternative engine conversions.


BenT
sent from my electronic leash

On May 11, 2011, at 4:11 PM, greg esposito <gregespo73@yahoo.com> wrote:

Ben, as someone who has been knee deep in BMW vanos and had to replace twin turbos on a 3 series I can understand why he put a subaru engine in and not a BMW!!! Bmw's biggest problem is not this mans engineering ability but their CBS (condition based servicing) system. Those valve trains have tiny ports and filters everywhere and then they allow an engine to do 30,000kms between service! There is often serious sludge in the engine at the first service. I am not anti subaru, in fact I love their product. My van still has its original engine and as far as I can tell has not had a rocker cover off. If the van was rough I would love to do the cut out arch, fire breathing thing but not on this bus. The one massive hurdel, as I see it, with big engines in these vans is the gearbox. In time the parts suppliers will see a gap in the market as gowesty did and start making high comp p&l sets, stroked rods and cranks. Greg E

From: BenT Syncro <syncro@gmail.com>
To: "Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, 12 May 2011 7:49 AM
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 
My Syncro 16 with a factory installed 1.6TD JX engine with 6.17 gears had no problem running 65-75mph. It was even able to pull a tree stump 8" in diameter from my yard while is 'G' gear. The trouble starts on even modest hills. A judicious use of the left foot is needed in advance of any decent grade. As many diesel owners will tell you, EGT (exhaust gas temps) is your enemy. EGT climbs as you ascent due to added fuel. I do not have this problem as bad on the 1.9TD which replaced the 1.6TD.

But JX or AAZ is immaterial as Greg has expressed he is committed to the WBX. I won't fault you for that choice as it would be my first choice to preserve future collector value (if that's important to you). Same reason why I went to a 1.9TD instead of TDI. But Greg, let me leave you with this thought. The person who was in charge of BMW's powertrain division responsible for the twin turbo six, VANOS variable valve timing and now project manager for BMW's hybrid division, installed a Subaru 3.3 SVX engine in his Syncro. This from a man who makes very serious engineering decisions.


BenT

sent from my electronic leash

On May 11, 2011, at 2:22 PM, "Scott Daniel  - Turbovans" <ScottDaniel@turbovans.com> wrote:

good post Ben.
minor picky point..
re
1.6TD AAZ
 
the engine code for a 1.6 TD isn't  'AAZ' ..
 
it's some other two letter code.
they're 60 hp and 90 ft lbs or torque, something like that ..I have it on a chart somewhere,
and while VW put that engine in their Syncro vans ( JX code .....that is a european factory 1.6 TD engine in a T3 van ....slightly different - much better mid-range torque - than the 1.6 TD's from jettas and golfs we see here in the US )
 anyway ...a 1.6 TD   will barely cut it in a Synro Van.
 
I'm not nutty about TDI engines ..
but my understanding is that they'll climb just anything at very low speed, at idle even, in a good syncro van.  Tons of low end grunt in those engines. If you don't mind it being a diesel.
 
----- 


Ben, Was only joking about the bmw transplant. They are a good engine for the car they are built for but I would not own one out of the warranty period. As far as I can tell the two companies that have offered big bore P&L sets are cofap (brazilian) and qsc (chinese). The qsc ones at one time had a very high compression ratio. They now have the same issue as the cofaps in that the piston pin hole is too high in the piston causing the piston to not reach the top of the bore. Chris's idea is to use a longer rod from a t1 that extends the piston beyond the top of the bore and then machine the face of the piston to achieve perfect deck hieght. Alot of faffing around but you end up with a 2.2 high compression engine with lighter and stronger rods. Gowesty have spent alot of time developing pistons with their US manufacturer (JE) to suit their engine program the problem is the standard stroke engine has 8.7/1 cr and the other stroked engines have moved the piston pin to accomodate the longer rod. Not that they offer piston and liner sets any way. Greg E

From: BenT Syncro <syncro@gmail.com>
To: "Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, 12 May 2011 9:40 AM
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 
Greg,

The VW 1.8T engines from the same malady. The reason for not putting a BMW engine is packaging and cost. Most BMW sixers are too long. The Syncro transaxle is also not known for liking more than 200hp put through it's teeth.

Larger piston and liner sets have been available before Lucas & Co. at GoWesty got their hands dirty with them. I had a supplier here who had a 40-foot container load of those pistons which were sold wholesale to US shops. It's been a few years but I could ask for you, if you like. It is my understanding that GW has switched to a domestically manufactured piston for various reasons.

I seem to recall there were clearance issues with the larger pistons and at some point, the vendor started selling them with relief pockets for valves. I don't remember the whole story anymore as this was years ago. Most retailers moved away from the 'big bore & stroker engines' as less expensive and more reliable alternatives presented themselves in the form of alternative engine conversions.


BenT
sent from my electronic leash

On May 11, 2011, at 4:11 PM, greg esposito <gregespo73@yahoo.com> wrote:

Ben, as someone who has been knee deep in BMW vanos and had to replace twin turbos on a 3 series I can understand why he put a subaru engine in and not a BMW!!! Bmw's biggest problem is not this mans engineering ability but their CBS (condition based servicing) system. Those valve trains have tiny ports and filters everywhere and then they allow an engine to do 30,000kms between service! There is often serious sludge in the engine at the first service. I am not anti subaru, in fact I love their product. My van still has its original engine and as far as I can tell has not had a rocker cover off. If the van was rough I would love to do the cut out arch, fire breathing thing but not on this bus. The one massive hurdel, as I see it, with big engines in these vans is the gearbox. In time the parts suppliers will see a gap in the market as gowesty did and start making high comp p&l sets, stroked rods and cranks. Greg E

From: BenT Syncro <syncro@gmail.com>
To: "Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, 12 May 2011 7:49 AM
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 
My Syncro 16 with a factory installed 1.6TD JX engine with 6.17 gears had no problem running 65-75mph. It was even able to pull a tree stump 8" in diameter from my yard while is 'G' gear. The trouble starts on even modest hills. A judicious use of the left foot is needed in advance of any decent grade. As many diesel owners will tell you, EGT (exhaust gas temps) is your enemy. EGT climbs as you ascent due to added fuel. I do not have this problem as bad on the 1.9TD which replaced the 1.6TD.

But JX or AAZ is immaterial as Greg has expressed he is committed to the WBX. I won't fault you for that choice as it would be my first choice to preserve future collector value (if that's important to you). Same reason why I went to a 1.9TD instead of TDI. But Greg, let me leave you with this thought. The person who was in charge of BMW's powertrain division responsible for the twin turbo six, VANOS variable valve timing and now project manager for BMW's hybrid division, installed a Subaru 3.3 SVX engine in his Syncro. This from a man who makes very serious engineering decisions.


BenT

sent from my electronic leash

On May 11, 2011, at 2:22 PM, "Scott Daniel  - Turbovans" <ScottDaniel@turbovans.com> wrote:

good post Ben.
minor picky point..
re
1.6TD AAZ
 
the engine code for a 1.6 TD isn't  'AAZ' ..
 
it's some other two letter code.
they're 60 hp and 90 ft lbs or torque, something like that ..I have it on a chart somewhere,
and while VW put that engine in their Syncro vans ( JX code .....that is a european factory 1.6 TD engine in a T3 van ....slightly different - much better mid-range torque - than the 1.6 TD's from jettas and golfs we see here in the US )
 anyway ...a 1.6 TD   will barely cut it in a Synro Van.
 
I'm not nutty about TDI engines ..
but my understanding is that they'll climb just anything at very low speed, at idle even, in a good syncro van.  Tons of low end grunt in those engines. If you don't mind it being a diesel.
 
----- 





good info, thanks.
re
" Chris's idea is to use a longer rod from a t1 "
 
what engine is that ? ...
T1 ..as in VW bug, or ?
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, May 11, 2011 6:25 PM
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 

Ben, Was only joking about the bmw transplant. They are a good engine for the car they are built for but I would not own one out of the warranty period. As far as I can tell the two companies that have offered big bore P&L sets are cofap (brazilian) and qsc (chinese). The qsc ones at one time had a very high compression ratio. They now have the same issue as the cofaps in that the piston pin hole is too high in the piston causing the piston to not reach the top of the bore. Chris's idea is to use a longer rod from a t1 that extends the piston beyond the top of the bore and then machine the face of the piston to achieve perfect deck hieght. Alot of faffing around but you end up with a 2.2 high compression engine with lighter and stronger rods. Gowesty have spent alot of time developing pistons with their US manufacturer (JE) to suit their engine program the problem is the standard stroke engine has 8.7/1 cr and the other stroked engines have moved the piston pin to accomodate the longer rod. Not that they offer piston and liner sets any way. Greg E

From: BenT Syncro <syncro@gmail.com>
To: "Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, 12 May 2011 9:40 AM
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 
Greg,

The VW 1.8T engines from the same malady. The reason for not putting a BMW engine is packaging and cost. Most BMW sixers are too long. The Syncro transaxle is also not known for liking more than 200hp put through it's teeth.

Larger piston and liner sets have been available before Lucas & Co. at GoWesty got their hands dirty with them. I had a supplier here who had a 40-foot container load of those pistons which were sold wholesale to US shops. It's been a few years but I could ask for you, if you like. It is my understanding that GW has switched to a domestically manufactured piston for various reasons.

I seem to recall there were clearance issues with the larger pistons and at some point, the vendor started selling them with relief pockets for valves. I don't remember the whole story anymore as this was years ago. Most retailers moved away from the 'big bore & stroker engines' as less expensive and more reliable alternatives presented themselves in the form of alternative engine conversions.


BenT
sent from my electronic leash

On May 11, 2011, at 4:11 PM, greg esposito <gregespo73@yahoo.com> wrote:

Ben, as someone who has been knee deep in BMW vanos and had to replace twin turbos on a 3 series I can understand why he put a subaru engine in and not a BMW!!! Bmw's biggest problem is not this mans engineering ability but their CBS (condition based servicing) system. Those valve trains have tiny ports and filters everywhere and then they allow an engine to do 30,000kms between service! There is often serious sludge in the engine at the first service. I am not anti subaru, in fact I love their product. My van still has its original engine and as far as I can tell has not had a rocker cover off. If the van was rough I would love to do the cut out arch, fire breathing thing but not on this bus. The one massive hurdel, as I see it, with big engines in these vans is the gearbox. In time the parts suppliers will see a gap in the market as gowesty did and start making high comp p&l sets, stroked rods and cranks. Greg E

From: BenT Syncro <syncro@gmail.com>
To: "Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, 12 May 2011 7:49 AM
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 
My Syncro 16 with a factory installed 1.6TD JX engine with 6.17 gears had no problem running 65-75mph. It was even able to pull a tree stump 8" in diameter from my yard while is 'G' gear. The trouble starts on even modest hills. A judicious use of the left foot is needed in advance of any decent grade. As many diesel owners will tell you, EGT (exhaust gas temps) is your enemy. EGT climbs as you ascent due to added fuel. I do not have this problem as bad on the 1.9TD which replaced the 1.6TD.

But JX or AAZ is immaterial as Greg has expressed he is committed to the WBX. I won't fault you for that choice as it would be my first choice to preserve future collector value (if that's important to you). Same reason why I went to a 1.9TD instead of TDI. But Greg, let me leave you with this thought. The person who was in charge of BMW's powertrain division responsible for the twin turbo six, VANOS variable valve timing and now project manager for BMW's hybrid division, installed a Subaru 3.3 SVX engine in his Syncro. This from a man who makes very serious engineering decisions.


BenT

sent from my electronic leash

On May 11, 2011, at 2:22 PM, "Scott Daniel  - Turbovans" <ScottDaniel@turbovans.com> wrote:

good post Ben.
minor picky point..
re
1.6TD AAZ
 
the engine code for a 1.6 TD isn't  'AAZ' ..
 
it's some other two letter code.
they're 60 hp and 90 ft lbs or torque, something like that ..I have it on a chart somewhere,
and while VW put that engine in their Syncro vans ( JX code .....that is a european factory 1.6 TD engine in a T3 van ....slightly different - much better mid-range torque - than the 1.6 TD's from jettas and golfs we see here in the US )
 anyway ...a 1.6 TD   will barely cut it in a Synro Van.
 
I'm not nutty about TDI engines ..
but my understanding is that they'll climb just anything at very low speed, at idle even, in a good syncro van.  Tons of low end grunt in those engines. If you don't mind it being a diesel.
 
----- 




Sorry Scott, type 1 engine (beetle). Type one rods are available in lots of lengths the only mod needed is to bore the small end bush from 22mm to 24mm. You have to go up to 5.5" rods, this will change your rod ratio but not by much. As far as I can work out the cam, cog and some oil pumps can also be used from type 1.

From: Scott Daniel - Turbovans <ScottDaniel@turbovans.com>
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, 12 May 2011 12:28 PM
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 

good info, thanks.
re
" Chris's idea is to use a longer rod from a t1 "
 
what engine is that ? ...
T1 ..as in VW bug, or ?
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, May 11, 2011 6:25 PM
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 
Ben, Was only joking about the bmw transplant. They are a good engine for the car they are built for but I would not own one out of the warranty period. As far as I can tell the two companies that have offered big bore P&L sets are cofap (brazilian) and qsc (chinese). The qsc ones at one time had a very high compression ratio. They now have the same issue as the cofaps in that the piston pin hole is too high in the piston causing the piston to not reach the top of the bore. Chris's idea is to use a longer rod from a t1 that extends the piston beyond the top of the bore and then machine the face of the piston to achieve perfect deck hieght. Alot of faffing around but you end up with a 2.2 high compression engine with lighter and stronger rods. Gowesty have spent alot of time developing pistons with their US manufacturer (JE) to suit their engine program the problem is the standard stroke engine has 8.7/1 cr and the other stroked engines have moved the piston pin to accomodate the longer rod. Not that they offer piston and liner sets any way. Greg E

From: BenT Syncro <syncro@gmail.com>
To: "Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, 12 May 2011 9:40 AM
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 
Greg,

The VW 1.8T engines from the same malady. The reason for not putting a BMW engine is packaging and cost. Most BMW sixers are too long. The Syncro transaxle is also not known for liking more than 200hp put through it's teeth.

Larger piston and liner sets have been available before Lucas & Co. at GoWesty got their hands dirty with them. I had a supplier here who had a 40-foot container load of those pistons which were sold wholesale to US shops. It's been a few years but I could ask for you, if you like. It is my understanding that GW has switched to a domestically manufactured piston for various reasons.

I seem to recall there were clearance issues with the larger pistons and at some point, the vendor started selling them with relief pockets for valves. I don't remember the whole story anymore as this was years ago. Most retailers moved away from the 'big bore & stroker engines' as less expensive and more reliable alternatives presented themselves in the form of alternative engine conversions.


BenT
sent from my electronic leash

On May 11, 2011, at 4:11 PM, greg esposito <gregespo73@yahoo.com> wrote:

Ben, as someone who has been knee deep in BMW vanos and had to replace twin turbos on a 3 series I can understand why he put a subaru engine in and not a BMW!!! Bmw's biggest problem is not this mans engineering ability but their CBS (condition based servicing) system. Those valve trains have tiny ports and filters everywhere and then they allow an engine to do 30,000kms between service! There is often serious sludge in the engine at the first service. I am not anti subaru, in fact I love their product. My van still has its original engine and as far as I can tell has not had a rocker cover off. If the van was rough I would love to do the cut out arch, fire breathing thing but not on this bus. The one massive hurdel, as I see it, with big engines in these vans is the gearbox. In time the parts suppliers will see a gap in the market as gowesty did and start making high comp p&l sets, stroked rods and cranks. Greg E

From: BenT Syncro <syncro@gmail.com>
To: "Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, 12 May 2011 7:49 AM
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 
My Syncro 16 with a factory installed 1.6TD JX engine with 6.17 gears had no problem running 65-75mph. It was even able to pull a tree stump 8" in diameter from my yard while is 'G' gear. The trouble starts on even modest hills. A judicious use of the left foot is needed in advance of any decent grade. As many diesel owners will tell you, EGT (exhaust gas temps) is your enemy. EGT climbs as you ascent due to added fuel. I do not have this problem as bad on the 1.9TD which replaced the 1.6TD.

But JX or AAZ is immaterial as Greg has expressed he is committed to the WBX. I won't fault you for that choice as it would be my first choice to preserve future collector value (if that's important to you). Same reason why I went to a 1.9TD instead of TDI. But Greg, let me leave you with this thought. The person who was in charge of BMW's powertrain division responsible for the twin turbo six, VANOS variable valve timing and now project manager for BMW's hybrid division, installed a Subaru 3.3 SVX engine in his Syncro. This from a man who makes very serious engineering decisions.


BenT

sent from my electronic leash

On May 11, 2011, at 2:22 PM, "Scott Daniel  - Turbovans" <ScottDaniel@turbovans.com> wrote:

good post Ben.
minor picky point..
re
1.6TD AAZ
 
the engine code for a 1.6 TD isn't  'AAZ' ..
 
it's some other two letter code.
they're 60 hp and 90 ft lbs or torque, something like that ..I have it on a chart somewhere,
and while VW put that engine in their Syncro vans ( JX code .....that is a european factory 1.6 TD engine in a T3 van ....slightly different - much better mid-range torque - than the 1.6 TD's from jettas and golfs we see here in the US )
 anyway ...a 1.6 TD   will barely cut it in a Synro Van.
 
I'm not nutty about TDI engines ..
but my understanding is that they'll climb just anything at very low speed, at idle even, in a good syncro van.  Tons of low end grunt in those engines. If you don't mind it being a diesel.
 
----- 







thanks for the info  Greg.
 
I try not to get too involved with older air-cooled Beetle stuff these days, but it's good to know.
 
Scott
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, May 11, 2011 8:06 PM
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 

Sorry Scott, type 1 engine (beetle). Type one rods are available in lots of lengths the only mod needed is to bore the small end bush from 22mm to 24mm. You have to go up to 5.5" rods, this will change your rod ratio but not by much. As far as I can work out the cam, cog and some oil pumps can also be used from type 1.

From: Scott Daniel - Turbovans <ScottDaniel@turbovans.com>
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, 12 May 2011 12:28 PM
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 

good info, thanks.
re
" Chris's idea is to use a longer rod from a t1 "
 
what engine is that ? ...
T1 ..as in VW bug, or ?
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, May 11, 2011 6:25 PM
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 
Ben, Was only joking about the bmw transplant. They are a good engine for the car they are built for but I would not own one out of the warranty period. As far as I can tell the two companies that have offered big bore P&L sets are cofap (brazilian) and qsc (chinese). The qsc ones at one time had a very high compression ratio. They now have the same issue as the cofaps in that the piston pin hole is too high in the piston causing the piston to not reach the top of the bore. Chris's idea is to use a longer rod from a t1 that extends the piston beyond the top of the bore and then machine the face of the piston to achieve perfect deck hieght. Alot of faffing around but you end up with a 2.2 high compression engine with lighter and stronger rods. Gowesty have spent alot of time developing pistons with their US manufacturer (JE) to suit their engine program the problem is the standard stroke engine has 8.7/1 cr and the other stroked engines have moved the piston pin to accomodate the longer rod. Not that they offer piston and liner sets any way. Greg E

From: BenT Syncro <syncro@gmail.com>
To: "Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, 12 May 2011 9:40 AM
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 
Greg,

The VW 1.8T engines from the same malady. The reason for not putting a BMW engine is packaging and cost. Most BMW sixers are too long. The Syncro transaxle is also not known for liking more than 200hp put through it's teeth.

Larger piston and liner sets have been available before Lucas & Co. at GoWesty got their hands dirty with them. I had a supplier here who had a 40-foot container load of those pistons which were sold wholesale to US shops. It's been a few years but I could ask for you, if you like. It is my understanding that GW has switched to a domestically manufactured piston for various reasons.

I seem to recall there were clearance issues with the larger pistons and at some point, the vendor started selling them with relief pockets for valves. I don't remember the whole story anymore as this was years ago. Most retailers moved away from the 'big bore & stroker engines' as less expensive and more reliable alternatives presented themselves in the form of alternative engine conversions.


BenT
sent from my electronic leash

On May 11, 2011, at 4:11 PM, greg esposito <gregespo73@yahoo.com> wrote:

Ben, as someone who has been knee deep in BMW vanos and had to replace twin turbos on a 3 series I can understand why he put a subaru engine in and not a BMW!!! Bmw's biggest problem is not this mans engineering ability but their CBS (condition based servicing) system. Those valve trains have tiny ports and filters everywhere and then they allow an engine to do 30,000kms between service! There is often serious sludge in the engine at the first service. I am not anti subaru, in fact I love their product. My van still has its original engine and as far as I can tell has not had a rocker cover off. If the van was rough I would love to do the cut out arch, fire breathing thing but not on this bus. The one massive hurdel, as I see it, with big engines in these vans is the gearbox. In time the parts suppliers will see a gap in the market as gowesty did and start making high comp p&l sets, stroked rods and cranks. Greg E

From: BenT Syncro <syncro@gmail.com>
To: "Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, 12 May 2011 7:49 AM
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] engine options

 
My Syncro 16 with a factory installed 1.6TD JX engine with 6.17 gears had no problem running 65-75mph. It was even able to pull a tree stump 8" in diameter from my yard while is 'G' gear. The trouble starts on even modest hills. A judicious use of the left foot is needed in advance of any decent grade. As many diesel owners will tell you, EGT (exhaust gas temps) is your enemy. EGT climbs as you ascent due to added fuel. I do not have this problem as bad on the 1.9TD which replaced the 1.6TD.

But JX or AAZ is immaterial as Greg has expressed he is committed to the WBX. I won't fault you for that choice as it would be my first choice to preserve future collector value (if that's important to you). Same reason why I went to a 1.9TD instead of TDI. But Greg, let me leave you with this thought. The person who was in charge of BMW's powertrain division responsible for the twin turbo six, VANOS variable valve timing and now project manager for BMW's hybrid division, installed a Subaru 3.3 SVX engine in his Syncro. This from a man who makes very serious engineering decisions.


BenT

sent from my electronic leash

On May 11, 2011, at 2:22 PM, "Scott Daniel  - Turbovans" <ScottDaniel@turbovans.com> wrote:

good post Ben.
minor picky point..
re
1.6TD AAZ
 
the engine code for a 1.6 TD isn't  'AAZ' ..
 
it's some other two letter code.
they're 60 hp and 90 ft lbs or torque, something like that ..I have it on a chart somewhere,
and while VW put that engine in their Syncro vans ( JX code .....that is a european factory 1.6 TD engine in a T3 van ....slightly different - much better mid-range torque - than the 1.6 TD's from jettas and golfs we see here in the US )
 anyway ...a 1.6 TD   will barely cut it in a Synro Van.
 
I'm not nutty about TDI engines ..
but my understanding is that they'll climb just anything at very low speed, at idle even, in a good syncro van.  Tons of low end grunt in those engines. If you don't mind it being a diesel.
 
-----