insolation / isolation

hy there,


i am planing on changing the insolation/fiberglass matting out of my Syncro. is there an Australian alternative to the widely available x-insolation.
bunnings doesn't seem to have good materials available.

clark rubber does but it's not self adhesive!

what do the locals use?



any advice would help,

regards
Jens
Interesting u ask.

Only last week I was installing insulation that was self adhesive and recommended to me by my refrigeration guy as he uses it on air-conditioning ducting.

I got it from a building supply store.
It was available in 12 or 20+ mm thickness. It was a grey foam that had a aluminium foil backing. The adhesive was extremely strong and basically if u stuffed it up and tried to remove it half remained glued to your shell.

I will take pictures of it tomorrow.

Hamish.


Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:05 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:

> hy there,
>
>
> i am planing on changing the insolation/fiberglass matting out of my Syncro. is there an Australian alternative to the widely available x-insolation.
> bunnings doesn't seem to have good materials available.
>
> clark rubber does but it's not self adhesive!
>
> what do the locals use?
>
>
>
> any advice would help,
>
> regards
> Jens
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
that sounds like the stuff people are refering to,
what is it called and were can i get it from?


thank you for that Hamish

Jens




Am 15.07.2013 um 21:15 schrieb HamishD:

 

Interesting u ask.

Only last week I was installing insulation that was self adhesive and recommended to me by my refrigeration guy as he uses it on air-conditioning ducting.

I got it from a building supply store.
It was available in 12 or 20+ mm thickness. It was a grey foam that had a aluminium foil backing. The adhesive was extremely strong and basically if u stuffed it up and tried to remove it half remained glued to your shell.

I will take pictures of it tomorrow.

Hamish.


Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:05 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:

> hy there,
>
>
> i am planing on changing the insolation/fiberglass matting out of my Syncro. is there an Australian alternative to the widely available x-insolation.
> bunnings doesn't seem to have good materials available.
>
> clark rubber does but it's not self adhesive!
>
> what do the locals use?
>
>
>
> any advice would help,
>
> regards
> Jens
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>


I don't know it's name but I will call the place tomorrow for u that I purchased it from. Then i will tell u.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:19 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:

that sounds like the stuff people are refering to,
what is it called and were can i get it from?


thank you for that Hamish

Jens




Am 15.07.2013 um 21:15 schrieb HamishD:

 

Interesting u ask.

Only last week I was installing insulation that was self adhesive and recommended to me by my refrigeration guy as he uses it on air-conditioning ducting.

I got it from a building supply store.
It was available in 12 or 20+ mm thickness. It was a grey foam that had a aluminium foil backing. The adhesive was extremely strong and basically if u stuffed it up and tried to remove it half remained glued to your shell.

I will take pictures of it tomorrow.

Hamish.


Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:05 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:

> hy there,
>
>
> i am planing on changing the insolation/fiberglass matting out of my Syncro. is there an Australian alternative to the widely available x-insolation.
> bunnings doesn't seem to have good materials available.
>
> clark rubber does but it's not self adhesive!
>
> what do the locals use?
>
>
>
> any advice would help,
>
> regards
> Jens
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>


It's called formshield

10 or 20 mm thickness 

Available from building supplies.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:21 PM, HamishD <dobson_hamish@yahoo.com.au> wrote:

I don't know it's name but I will call the place tomorrow for u that I purchased it from. Then i will tell u.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:19 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:

that sounds like the stuff people are refering to,
what is it called and were can i get it from?


thank you for that Hamish

Jens




Am 15.07.2013 um 21:15 schrieb HamishD:

 

Interesting u ask.

Only last week I was installing insulation that was self adhesive and recommended to me by my refrigeration guy as he uses it on air-conditioning ducting.

I got it from a building supply store.
It was available in 12 or 20+ mm thickness. It was a grey foam that had a aluminium foil backing. The adhesive was extremely strong and basically if u stuffed it up and tried to remove it half remained glued to your shell.

I will take pictures of it tomorrow.

Hamish.


Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:05 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:

> hy there,
>
>
> i am planing on changing the insolation/fiberglass matting out of my Syncro. is there an Australian alternative to the widely available x-insolation.
> bunnings doesn't seem to have good materials available.
>
> clark rubber does but it's not self adhesive!
>
> what do the locals use?
>
>
>
> any advice would help,
>
> regards
> Jens
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>


Thanks, I'll get onto that and after finishing I'll send some photos...,

Jens 

Von meinem iPhone gesendet

Am 16.07.2013 um 12:51 schrieb HamishD <dobson_hamish@yahoo.com.au>:

 

It's called formshield

10 or 20 mm thickness 

Available from building supplies.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:21 PM, HamishD <dobson_hamish@yahoo.com.au> wrote:

I don't know it's name but I will call the place tomorrow for u that I purchased it from. Then i will tell u.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:19 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:

that sounds like the stuff people are refering to,
what is it called and were can i get it from?


thank you for that Hamish

Jens




Am 15.07.2013 um 21:15 schrieb HamishD:

 

Interesting u ask.

Only last week I was installing insulation that was self adhesive and recommended to me by my refrigeration guy as he uses it on air-conditioning ducting.

I got it from a building supply store.
It was available in 12 or 20+ mm thickness. It was a grey foam that had a aluminium foil backing. The adhesive was extremely strong and basically if u stuffed it up and tried to remove it half remained glued to your shell.

I will take pictures of it tomorrow.

Hamish.


Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:05 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:

> hy there,
>
>
> i am planing on changing the insolation/fiberglass matting out of my Syncro. is there an Australian alternative to the widely available x-insolation.
> bunnings doesn't seem to have good materials available.
>
> clark rubber does but it's not self adhesive!
>
> what do the locals use?
>
>
>
> any advice would help,
>
> regards
> Jens
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>


Hi guys,
thought I'd come in on this, because I was once regarded an insulation guru.

First of all, I'm not aware that my Syncro has any, certainly none in the side panels.

There are fundamentally two types of insulation:
1. Reflective insulation
This works by reflecting electro magnetic radiation ( eg the rays of a hot surface ).
Also, reflective surfaces are not good at giving off heat.
Insulation with a reflective surface must have the reflective surface exposed to the air.
( A heap of reflective surfaces stacked on top of one another is only one reflective surface, the one exposed to the air.)

2. For want of another description: Bulk insulation
Examples: Fibre glass, polystyrene foam, sponge rubber.
These work best when the material itself is least conductive, and there are lots of little air spaces in the matrix.
Basic rule: the thicker bulk insulation is the more effective it is at insulation.

My favorite insulation, if I wanted to insulate the walls of my Syncro behind the linings:
Polystyrene:
It is available in a range of thicknesses so it can be bent around curved surfaces, can even be bought fire retarded.
It can be glued to it self and other surfaces. Contact adhesives work well once the smell has gone.
I would layer it and make sure the last layer had an Alfoil like surface facing air and the linings.

Hope this helps.

Peter




--Original Message Text---
From: HamishD
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2013 12:51:51 +1000



It's called formshield


10 or 20 mm thickness


Available from building supplies.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:21 PM, HamishD <dobson_hamish@yahoo.com.au> wrote:


I don't know it's name but I will call the place tomorrow for u that I purchased it from. Then i will tell u.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:19 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:


that sounds like the stuff people are refering to,what is it called and were can i get it from?




thank you for that Hamish


Jens







Am 15.07.2013 um 21:15 schrieb HamishD:



Interesting u ask.

Only last week I was installing insulation that was self adhesive and recommended to me by my refrigeration guy as he uses it on air-conditioning ducting.

I got it from a building supply store.
It was available in 12 or 20+ mm thickness. It was a grey foam that had a aluminium foil backing. The adhesive was extremely strong and basically if u stuffed it up and tried to remove it half remained glued to your shell.

I will take pictures of it tomorrow.

Hamish.


Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:05 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:

> hy there,
>
>
> i am planing on changing the insolation/fiberglass matting out of my Syncro. is there an Australian alternative to the widely available x-insolation.
> bunnings doesn't seem to have good materials available.
>
> clark rubber does but it's not self adhesive!
>
> what do the locals use?
>
>
>
> any advice would help,
>
> regards
> Jens
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>

















This helps a lot and will take this into consideration.

Jens



Von meinem iPhone gesendet

Am 16.07.2013 um 13:41 schrieb Peter Schweinsberg <peter@peterandval.com>:

 

Hi guys,
thought I'd come in on this, because I was once regarded an insulation guru.

First of all, I'm not aware that my Syncro has any, certainly none in the side panels.

There are fundamentally two types of insulation:
1. Reflective insulation
This works by reflecting electro magnetic radiation ( eg the rays of a hot surface ).
Also, reflective surfaces are not good at giving off heat.
Insulation with a reflective surface must have the reflective surface exposed to the air.
( A heap of reflective surfaces stacked on top of one another is only one reflective surface, the one exposed to the air.)

2. For want of another description: Bulk insulation
Examples: Fibre glass, polystyrene foam, sponge rubber.
These work best when the material itself is least conductive, and there are lots of little air spaces in the matrix.
Basic rule: the thicker bulk insulation is the more effective it is at insulation.

My favorite insulation, if I wanted to insulate the walls of my Syncro behind the linings:
Polystyrene:
It is available in a range of thicknesses so it can be bent around curved surfaces, can even be bought fire retarded.
It can be glued to it self and other surfaces. Contact adhesives work well once the smell has gone.
I would layer it and make sure the last layer had an Alfoil like surface facing air and the linings.

Hope this helps.

Peter




--Original Message Text---
From: HamishD
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2013 12:51:51 +1000



It's called formshield


10 or 20 mm thickness


Available from building supplies.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:21 PM, HamishD <dobson_hamish@yahoo.com.au> wrote:


I don't know it's name but I will call the place tomorrow for u that I purchased it from. Then i will tell u.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:19 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:


that sounds like the stuff people are refering to,what is it called and were can i get it from?




thank you for that Hamish


Jens







Am 15.07.2013 um 21:15 schrieb HamishD:



Interesting u ask.

Only last week I was installing insulation that was self adhesive and recommended to me by my refrigeration guy as he uses it on air-conditioning ducting.

I got it from a building supply store.
It was available in 12 or 20+ mm thickness. It was a grey foam that had a aluminium foil backing. The adhesive was extremely strong and basically if u stuffed it up and tried to remove it half remained glued to your shell.

I will take pictures of it tomorrow.

Hamish.


Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:05 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:

> hy there,
>
>
> i am planing on changing the insolation/fiberglass matting out of my Syncro. is there an Australian alternative to the widely available x-insolation.
> bunnings doesn't seem to have good materials available.
>
> clark rubber does but it's not self adhesive!
>
> what do the locals use?
>
>
>
> any advice would help,
>
> regards
> Jens
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>

















How about using insulation that is designed for cars, not houses? Dynamat etc.



----- Original Message -----
From:
Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com

To:
"Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
Cc:

Sent:
Tue, 16 Jul 2013 13:41:35 +1000
Subject:
Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] insolation / isolation


Hi guys,
thought I'd come in on this, because I was once regarded an insulation guru.

First of all, I'm not aware that my Syncro has any, certainly none in the side panels.

There are fundamentally two types of insulation:
1. Reflective insulation
This works by reflecting electro magnetic radiation ( eg the rays of a hot surface ).
Also, reflective surfaces are not good at giving off heat.
Insulation with a reflective surface must have the reflective surface exposed to the air.
( A heap of reflective surfaces stacked on top of one another is only one reflective surface, the one exposed to the air.)

2. For want of another description: Bulk insulation
Examples: Fibre glass, polystyrene foam, sponge rubber.
These work best when the material itself is least conductive, and there are lots of little air spaces in the matrix.
Basic rule: the thicker bulk insulation is the more effective it is at insulation.

My favorite insulation, if I wanted to insulate the walls of my Syncro behind the linings:
Polystyrene:
It is available in a range of thicknesses so it can be bent around curved surfaces, can even be bought fire retarded.
It can be glued to it self and other surfaces. Contact adhesives work well once the smell has gone.
I would layer it and make sure the last layer had an Alfoil like surface facing air and the linings.

Hope this helps.

Peter




--Original Message Text---
From: HamishD
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2013 12:51:51 +1000



It's called formshield


10 or 20 mm thickness


Available from building supplies.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:21 PM, HamishD <dobson_hamish@yahoo.com.au> wrote:


I don't know it's name but I will call the place tomorrow for u that I purchased it from. Then i will tell u.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:19 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:


that sounds like the stuff people are refering to,what is it called and were can i get it from?




thank you for that Hamish


Jens







Am 15.07.2013 um 21:15 schrieb HamishD:



Interesting u ask.

Only last week I was installing insulation that was self adhesive and recommended to me by my refrigeration guy as he uses it on air-conditioning ducting.

I got it from a building supply store.
It was available in 12 or 20+ mm thickness. It was a grey foam that had a aluminium foil backing. The adhesive was extremely strong and basically if u stuffed it up and tried to remove it half remained glued to your shell.

I will take pictures of it tomorrow.

Hamish.


Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:05 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:

> hy there,
>
>
> i am planing on changing the insolation/fiberglass matting out of my Syncro. is there an Australian alternative to the widely available x-insolation.
> bunnings doesn't seem to have good materials available.
>
> clark rubber does but it's not self adhesive!
>
> what do the locals use?
>
>
>
> any advice would help,
>
> regards
> Jens
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>


















Email sent using Optus Webmail
Insulation is insulation, and I have only talked insulation theory not building insulation.

Just don't use an insulation that will collapse or pack down like some bulk insulations ( fibreglass, rock wool, etc.)
Because they will pack down in a 4WD on corrugations.

They use polystyrene and similar in trucks and caravans.
They use rigid foam insulations in aeroplanes.
They use reflective insulations in space projects.

Brands I know nothing about,
but if it is advertised for a particular application,
it could be priced for the benefit of the vendor.

Peter



How about using insulation that is designed for cars, not houses? Dynamat etc.



----- Original Message -----
From:
Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com

To:
"Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
Cc:

Sent:
Tue, 16 Jul 2013 13:41:35 +1000
Subject:
Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] insolation / isolation


Â

Hi guys,
thought I'd come in on this, because I was once regarded an insulation guru.

First of all, I'm not aware that my Syncro has any, certainly none in the side panels.

There are fundamentally two types of insulation:
1. Reflective insulation
This works by reflecting electro magnetic radiation ( eg the rays of a hot surface ).
Also, reflective surfaces are not good at giving off heat.
Insulation with a reflective surface must have the reflective surface exposed to the air.
( A heap of reflective surfaces stacked on top of one another is only one reflective surface, the one exposed to the air.)

2. For want of another description: Bulk insulation
Examples: Fibre glass, polystyrene foam, sponge rubber.
These work best when the material itself is least conductive, and there are lots of little air spaces in the matrix.
Basic rule: the thicker bulk insulation is the more effective it is at insulation.

My favorite insulation, if I wanted to insulate the walls of my Syncro behind the linings:
Polystyrene:
It is available in a range of thicknesses so it can be bent around curved surfaces, can even be bought fire retarded.
It can be glued to it self and other surfaces. Contact adhesives work well once the smell has gone.
I would layer it and make sure the last layer had an Alfoil like surface facing air and the linings.

Hope this helps.

Peter




--Original Message Text---
From: HamishD
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2013 12:51:51 +1000



It's called formshield


10 or 20 mm thickness


Available from building supplies.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:21 PM, HamishD <dobson_hamish@yahoo.com.au> wrote:


I don't know it's name but I will call the place tomorrow for u that I purchased it from. Then i will tell u.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:19 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:


that sounds like the stuff people are refering to,what is it called and were can i get it from?




thank you for that Hamish


Jens







Am 15.07.2013 um 21:15 schrieb HamishD:



Interesting u ask.

Only last week I was installing insulation that was self adhesive and recommended to me by my refrigeration guy as he uses it on air-conditioning ducting.

I got it from a building supply store.
It was available in 12 or 20+ mm thickness. It was a grey foam that had a aluminium foil backing. The adhesive was extremely strong and basically if u stuffed it up and tried to remove it half remained glued to your shell.

I will take pictures of it tomorrow.

Hamish.


Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:05 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:

> hy there,
>
>
> i am planing on changing the insolation/fiberglass matting out of my Syncro. is there an Australian alternative to the widely available x-insolation.
> bunnings doesn't seem to have good materials available.
>
> clark rubber does but it's not self adhesive!
>
> what do the locals use?
>
>
>
> any advice would help,
>
> regards
> Jens
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>




















Email sent using Optus Webmail





How about using insulation that is designed for cars, not houses? Dynamat etc.



----- Original Message -----
From:
Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com

To:
"Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
Cc:

Sent:
Tue, 16 Jul 2013 13:41:35 +1000
Subject:
Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] insolation / isolation


Â

Hi guys,
thought I'd come in on this, because I was once regarded an insulation guru.

First of all, I'm not aware that my Syncro has any, certainly none in the side panels.

There are fundamentally two types of insulation:
1. Reflective insulation
This works by reflecting electro magnetic radiation ( eg the rays of a hot surface ).
Also, reflective surfaces are not good at giving off heat.
Insulation with a reflective surface must have the reflective surface exposed to the air.
( A heap of reflective surfaces stacked on top of one another is only one reflective surface, the one exposed to the air.)

2. For want of another description: Bulk insulation
Examples: Fibre glass, polystyrene foam, sponge rubber.
These work best when the material itself is least conductive, and there are lots of little air spaces in the matrix.
Basic rule: the thicker bulk insulation is the more effective it is at insulation.

My favorite insulation, if I wanted to insulate the walls of my Syncro behind the linings:
Polystyrene:
It is available in a range of thicknesses so it can be bent around curved surfaces, can even be bought fire retarded.
It can be glued to it self and other surfaces. Contact adhesives work well once the smell has gone.
I would layer it and make sure the last layer had an Alfoil like surface facing air and the linings.

Hope this helps.

Peter




--Original Message Text---
From: HamishD
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2013 12:51:51 +1000



It's called formshield


10 or 20 mm thickness


Available from building supplies.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:21 PM, HamishD <dobson_hamish@yahoo.com.au> wrote:


I don't know it's name but I will call the place tomorrow for u that I purchased it from. Then i will tell u.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:19 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:


that sounds like the stuff people are refering to,what is it called and were can i get it from?




thank you for that Hamish


Jens







Am 15.07.2013 um 21:15 schrieb HamishD:



Interesting u ask.

Only last week I was installing insulation that was self adhesive and recommended to me by my refrigeration guy as he uses it on air-conditioning ducting.

I got it from a building supply store.
It was available in 12 or 20+ mm thickness. It was a grey foam that had a aluminium foil backing. The adhesive was extremely strong and basically if u stuffed it up and tried to remove it half remained glued to your shell.

I will take pictures of it tomorrow.

Hamish.


Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:05 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:

> hy there,
>
>
> i am planing on changing the insolation/fiberglass matting out of my Syncro. is there an Australian alternative to the widely available x-insolation.
> bunnings doesn't seem to have good materials available.
>
> clark rubber does but it's not self adhesive!
>
> what do the locals use?
>
>
>
> any advice would help,
>
> regards
> Jens
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>


Email sent using Optus Webmail





hi Peter and everyone els who was interested,



i finally finished this insolation project and would like to share some information.

i was experimenting with some foam and sound deadening materials after reserching on some german car audio forums. (don't know how i got there) 


to skin this cat, sound and thermal insolation you need two different materials.

one solid/heavy/non water drawing sheet against vibration and one for the thermal side of things.



the first layer needs to be applied to the naked panels and against the advise of the sound man in the local car audio store it is not necessary to cover the whole car from top to bottom with the "fat mat" sound deadening stuff for more then 1000$ but only in the middle of each panel to stop the vibrations/repercussions transmitted from driving and engine noises to come inside. at Bunnings you can find the same stuff for a freaction of the cost. it is used for roof water proofing and consists of some type of leathery/tary black 3mm thick sheet covered with aluminum foil and pressure adhesive glue. 10m x 20cm for 65$ was enough for the job. i used some residual over the engine bay to shut it  up a bit. it worked a treat. 



i found that the foam to be used should only be fairly rigid or stable but soft enough to get into the many gaps that you need to fill. it is of utmost importance that you have a solid contact with the panels and thus using a mat that is prepared with an adhesive layer works best. if you have stacks of time and you like sniffing patex for a few days you can save 10$ per square meter of mat and glue it in yourself.


the rule with this stuff is, the more the better, full contact and the last layer facing into the van should be an reflective foil of sorts. (keeps the cold/heat in) the trapped are in the foam keeps the hot panels from radiating its heat/cold into the van. the material i used was called FORMSHIELD and i got it for 39$ per running meter from clark rubber. i used 4meters for the entire van, covering the doors and all residual side panels.


the doors close quietly and the driving noises disappeared rapidly. 


i used the old fiberglass stuff to draw up pattens that fit brilliantly and these could be reused by anyone in the Forum.

attatched i have some pics for proof.



thanks for your ongoing support.
i hope i could give something back.



 

Am 16.07.2013 um 14:36 schrieb Peter Schweinsberg:

 

Insulation is insulation, and I have only talked insulation theory not building insulation.

Just don't use an insulation that will collapse or pack down like some bulk insulations ( fibreglass, rock wool, etc.)
Because they will pack down in a 4WD on corrugations.

They use polystyrene and similar in trucks and caravans.
They use rigid foam insulations in aeroplanes.
They use reflective insulations in space projects.

Brands I know nothing about,
but if it is advertised for a particular application,
it could be priced for the benefit of the vendor.

Peter



How about using insulation that is designed for cars, not houses? Dynamat etc.



----- Original Message -----
From:
Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com

To:
"Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
Cc:

Sent:
Tue, 16 Jul 2013 13:41:35 +1000
Subject:
Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] insolation / isolation


Â

Hi guys,
thought I'd come in on this, because I was once regarded an insulation guru.

First of all, I'm not aware that my Syncro has any, certainly none in the side panels.

There are fundamentally two types of insulation:
1. Reflective insulation
This works by reflecting electro magnetic radiation ( eg the rays of a hot surface ).
Also, reflective surfaces are not good at giving off heat.
Insulation with a reflective surface must have the reflective surface exposed to the air.
( A heap of reflective surfaces stacked on top of one another is only one reflective surface, the one exposed to the air.)

2. For want of another description: Bulk insulation
Examples: Fibre glass, polystyrene foam, sponge rubber.
These work best when the material itself is least conductive, and there are lots of little air spaces in the matrix.
Basic rule: the thicker bulk insulation is the more effective it is at insulation.

My favorite insulation, if I wanted to insulate the walls of my Syncro behind the linings:
Polystyrene:
It is available in a range of thicknesses so it can be bent around curved surfaces, can even be bought fire retarded.
It can be glued to it self and other surfaces. Contact adhesives work well once the smell has gone.
I would layer it and make sure the last layer had an Alfoil like surface facing air and the linings.

Hope this helps.

Peter




--Original Message Text---
From: HamishD
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2013 12:51:51 +1000



It's called formshield


10 or 20 mm thickness


Available from building supplies.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:21 PM, HamishD <dobson_hamish@yahoo.com.au> wrote:


I don't know it's name but I will call the place tomorrow for u that I purchased it from. Then i will tell u.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:19 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:


that sounds like the stuff people are refering to,what is it called and were can i get it from?




thank you for that Hamish


Jens







Am 15.07.2013 um 21:15 schrieb HamishD:



Interesting u ask.

Only last week I was installing insulation that was self adhesive and recommended to me by my refrigeration guy as he uses it on air-conditioning ducting.

I got it from a building supply store.
It was available in 12 or 20+ mm thickness. It was a grey foam that had a aluminium foil backing. The adhesive was extremely strong and basically if u stuffed it up and tried to remove it half remained glued to your shell.

I will take pictures of it tomorrow.

Hamish.


Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:05 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:

> hy there,
>
>
> i am planing on changing the insolation/fiberglass matting out of my Syncro. is there an Australian alternative to the widely available x-insolation.
> bunnings doesn't seem to have good materials available.
>
> clark rubber does but it's not self adhesive!
>
> what do the locals use?
>
>
>
> any advice would help,
>
> regards
> Jens
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>




















Email sent using Optus Webmail





How about using insulation that is designed for cars, not houses? Dynamat etc.



----- Original Message -----
From:
Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com

To:
"Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
Cc:

Sent:
Tue, 16 Jul 2013 13:41:35 +1000
Subject:
Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] insolation / isolation


Â

Hi guys,
thought I'd come in on this, because I was once regarded an insulation guru.

First of all, I'm not aware that my Syncro has any, certainly none in the side panels.

There are fundamentally two types of insulation:
1. Reflective insulation
This works by reflecting electro magnetic radiation ( eg the rays of a hot surface ).
Also, reflective surfaces are not good at giving off heat.
Insulation with a reflective surface must have the reflective surface exposed to the air.
( A heap of reflective surfaces stacked on top of one another is only one reflective surface, the one exposed to the air.)

2. For want of another description: Bulk insulation
Examples: Fibre glass, polystyrene foam, sponge rubber.
These work best when the material itself is least conductive, and there are lots of little air spaces in the matrix.
Basic rule: the thicker bulk insulation is the more effective it is at insulation.

My favorite insulation, if I wanted to insulate the walls of my Syncro behind the linings:
Polystyrene:
It is available in a range of thicknesses so it can be bent around curved surfaces, can even be bought fire retarded.
It can be glued to it self and other surfaces. Contact adhesives work well once the smell has gone.
I would layer it and make sure the last layer had an Alfoil like surface facing air and the linings.

Hope this helps.

Peter




--Original Message Text---
From: HamishD
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2013 12:51:51 +1000



It's called formshield


10 or 20 mm thickness


Available from building supplies.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:21 PM, HamishD <dobson_hamish@yahoo.com.au> wrote:


I don't know it's name but I will call the place tomorrow for u that I purchased it from. Then i will tell u.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:19 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:


that sounds like the stuff people are refering to,what is it called and were can i get it from?




thank you for that Hamish


Jens







Am 15.07.2013 um 21:15 schrieb HamishD:



Interesting u ask.

Only last week I was installing insulation that was self adhesive and recommended to me by my refrigeration guy as he uses it on air-conditioning ducting.

I got it from a building supply store.
It was available in 12 or 20+ mm thickness. It was a grey foam that had a aluminium foil backing. The adhesive was extremely strong and basically if u stuffed it up and tried to remove it half remained glued to your shell.

I will take pictures of it tomorrow.

Hamish.


Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:05 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:

> hy there,
>
>
> i am planing on changing the insolation/fiberglass matting out of my Syncro. is there an Australian alternative to the widely available x-insolation.
> bunnings doesn't seem to have good materials available.
>
> clark rubber does but it's not self adhesive!
>
> what do the locals use?
>
>
>
> any advice would help,
>
> regards
> Jens
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>


Email sent using Optus Webmail






Jens,

That is an excellent report.  Thanks for putting in the time to share it with everyone.

Les


From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jens Baufeldt
Sent: 29 July 2013 20:26
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] insolation / isolation

 

hi Peter and everyone els who was interested,

 

i finally finished this insolation project and would like to share some information.

 

Jens,
 
Yes excellent, but one question is your sliding door on the right side?

Theo


At 08:33 PM 29/07/2013, you wrote:
 

Jens,

That is an excellent report.  Thanks for putting in the time to share it with everyone.

Les

From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com [ mailto:Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jens Baufeldt
Sent: 29 July 2013 20:26
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] insolation / isolation

 

hi Peter and everyone els who was interested,

 

i finally finished this insolation project and would like to share some information.

 

yes, i just imported my van and will get the steering converted with Paul Müller in SYD.

this is him,
Good to see another westy:)

Sent from my iPhone

On 29/07/2013, at 9:21 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:

yes, i just imported my van and will get the steering converted with Paul Müller in SYD.

this is him,
<P1010243.jpeg>



Am 29.07.2013 um 21:14 schrieb Theo Weiss:

 

Jens,
 
Yes excellent, but one question is your sliding door on the right side?

Theo


At 08:33 PM 29/07/2013, you wrote:

 

Jens,

That is an excellent report.  Thanks for putting in the time to share it with everyone.

Les

From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com [ mailto:Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jens Baufeldt
Sent: 29 July 2013 20:26
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] insolation / isolation

 

hi Peter and everyone els who was interested,

 

i finally finished this insolation project and would like to share some information.

 



Well done Jens,
You have given it a lot of thought and I'm sure that you have saved a lot of money.
I'll keep your e-mail because you have helped by listing the products you used.

Was not aware that you were after sound insulation as well.
You make a good point about this being a different problem to heat transfer insulation.
You are right, sound insulation material needs to be heavy and in a form that resists the transfer of vibrations.
In some building applications they use lead, but we would be kidding ourselves if we thought of using it in our Syncros.

Peter




On Mon, 29 Jul 2013 20:25:43 +1000, Jens Baufeldt wrote:

>hi Peter and everyone els who was interested,
>
>
>
>i finally finished this insolation project and would like to share some information.
>
>i was experimenting with some foam and sound deadening materials after reserching on some german car audio forums. (don't know how i got there)
>
>
>to skin this cat, sound and thermal insolation you need two different materials.
>
>one solid/heavy/non water drawing sheet against vibration and one for the thermal side of things.
>
>
>
>the first layer needs to be applied to the naked panels and against the advise of the sound man in the local car audio store it is not necessary to cover the whole car from top to bottom with the "fat mat" sound deadening stuff for more then 1000$ but only in the middle of each panel to stop the vibrations/repercussions transmitted from driving and engine noises to come inside. at Bunnings you can find the same stuff for a freaction of the cost. it is used for roof water proofing and consists of some type of leathery/tary black 3mm thick sheet covered with aluminum foil and pressure adhesive glue. 10m x 20cm for 65$ was enough for the job. i used some residual over the engine bay to shut it up a bit. it worked a treat.
>
>
>
>i found that the foam to be used should only be fairly rigid or stable but soft enough to get into the many gaps that you need to fill. it is of utmost importance that you have a solid contact with the panels and thus using a mat that is prepared with an adhesive layer works best. if you have stacks of time and you like sniffing patex for a few days you can save 10$ per square meter of mat and glue it in yourself.
>
>
>the rule with this stuff is, the more the better, full contact and the last layer facing into the van should be an reflective foil of sorts. (keeps the cold/heat in) the trapped are in the foam keeps the hot panels from radiating its heat/cold into the van. the material i used was called FORMSHIELD and i got it for 39$ per running meter from clark rubber. i used 4meters for the entire van, covering the doors and all residual side panels.
>
>
>the doors close quietly and the driving noises disappeared rapidly.
>
>
>i used the old fiberglass stuff to draw up pattens that fit brilliantly and these could be reused by anyone in the Forum.
>
>attatched i have some pics for proof.
>
>
>
>thanks for your ongoing support.
>i hope i could give something back.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>Am 16.07.2013 um 14:36 schrieb Peter Schweinsberg:
>
>> Insulation is insulation, and I have only talked insulation theory not building insulation.
>>
>> Just don't use an insulation that will collapse or pack down like some bulk insulations ( fibreglass, rock wool, etc.)
>> Because they will pack down in a 4WD on corrugations.
>>
>> They use polystyrene and similar in trucks and caravans.
>> They use rigid foam insulations in aeroplanes.
>> They use reflective insulations in space projects.
>>
>> Brands I know nothing about,
>> but if it is advertised for a particular application,
>> it could be priced for the benefit of the vendor.
>>
>> Peter
>>
>>
>>
>> How about using insulation that is designed for cars, not houses? Dynamat etc.
>>
>>
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From:
>> Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
>>
>> To:
>> "Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
>> Cc:
>>
>> Sent:
>> Tue, 16 Jul 2013 13:41:35 +1000
>> Subject:
>> Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] insolation / isolation
>>
>>
>> Â
>>
>> Hi guys,
>> thought I'd come in on this, because I was once regarded an insulation guru.
>>
>> First of all, I'm not aware that my Syncro has any, certainly none in the side panels.
>>
>> There are fundamentally two types of insulation:
>> 1. Reflective insulation
>> This works by reflecting electro magnetic radiation ( eg the rays of a hot surface ).
>> Also, reflective surfaces are not good at giving off heat.
>> Insulation with a reflective surface must have the reflective surface exposed to the air.
>> ( A heap of reflective surfaces stacked on top of one another is only one reflective surface, the one exposed to the air.)
>>
>> 2. For want of another description: Bulk insulation
>> Examples: Fibre glass, polystyrene foam, sponge rubber.
>> These work best when the material itself is least conductive, and there are lots of little air spaces in the matrix.
>> Basic rule: the thicker bulk insulation is the more effective it is at insulation.
>>
>> My favorite insulation, if I wanted to insulate the walls of my Syncro behind the linings:
>> Polystyrene:
>> It is available in a range of thicknesses so it can be bent around curved surfaces, can even be bought fire retarded.
>> It can be glued to it self and other surfaces. Contact adhesives work well once the smell has gone.
>> I would layer it and make sure the last layer had an Alfoil like surface facing air and the linings.
>>
>> Hope this helps.
>>
>> Peter
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --Original Message Text---
>> From: HamishD
>> Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2013 12:51:51 +1000
>>
>>
>>
>> It's called formshield
>>
>>
>> 10 or 20 mm thickness
>>
>>
>> Available from building supplies.
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On 15/07/2013, at 9:21 PM, HamishD <dobson_hamish@yahoo.com.au> wrote:
>>
>>
>> I don't know it's name but I will call the place tomorrow for u that I purchased it from. Then i will tell u.
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On 15/07/2013, at 9:19 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:
>>
>>
>> that sounds like the stuff people are refering to,what is it called and were can i get it from?
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> thank you for that Hamish
>>
>>
>> Jens
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Am 15.07.2013 um 21:15 schrieb HamishD:
>>
>>
>>
>> Interesting u ask.
>>
>> Only last week I was installing insulation that was self adhesive and recommended to me by my refrigeration guy as he uses it on air-conditioning ducting.
>>
>> I got it from a building supply store.
>> It was available in 12 or 20+ mm thickness. It was a grey foam that had a aluminium foil backing. The adhesive was extremely strong and basically if u stuffed it up and tried to remove it half remained glued to your shell.
>>
>> I will take pictures of it tomorrow.
>>
>> Hamish.
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On 15/07/2013, at 9:05 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:
>>
>> > hy there,
>> >
>> >
>> > i am planing on changing the insolation/fiberglass matting out of my Syncro. is there an Australian alternative to the widely available x-insolation.
>> > bunnings doesn't seem to have good materials available.
>> >
>> > clark rubber does but it's not self adhesive!
>> >
>> > what do the locals use?
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > any advice would help,
>> >
>> > regards
>> > Jens
>> >
>> > ------------------------------------
>> >
>> > Yahoo! Groups Links
>> >
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Email sent using Optus Webmail
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> How about using insulation that is designed for cars, not houses? Dynamat etc.
>>
>>
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From:
>> Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
>>
>> To:
>> "Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
>> Cc:
>>
>> Sent:
>> Tue, 16 Jul 2013 13:41:35 +1000
>> Subject:
>> Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] insolation / isolation
>>
>>
>> Â
>>
>> Hi guys,
>> thought I'd come in on this, because I was once regarded an insulation guru.
>>
>> First of all, I'm not aware that my Syncro has any, certainly none in the side panels.
>>
>> There are fundamentally two types of insulation:
>> 1. Reflective insulation
>> This works by reflecting electro magnetic radiation ( eg the rays of a hot surface ).
>> Also, reflective surfaces are not good at giving off heat.
>> Insulation with a reflective surface must have the reflective surface exposed to the air.
>> ( A heap of reflective surfaces stacked on top of one another is only one reflective surface, the one exposed to the air.)
>>
>> 2. For want of another description: Bulk insulation
>> Examples: Fibre glass, polystyrene foam, sponge rubber.
>> These work best when the material itself is least conductive, and there are lots of little air spaces in the matrix.
>> Basic rule: the thicker bulk insulation is the more effective it is at insulation.
>>
>> My favorite insulation, if I wanted to insulate the walls of my Syncro behind the linings:
>> Polystyrene:
>> It is available in a range of thicknesses so it can be bent around curved surfaces, can even be bought fire retarded.
>> It can be glued to it self and other surfaces. Contact adhesives work well once the smell has gone.
>> I would layer it and make sure the last layer had an Alfoil like surface facing air and the linings.
>>
>> Hope this helps.
>>
>> Peter
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --Original Message Text---
>> From: HamishD
>> Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2013 12:51:51 +1000
>>
>>
>>
>> It's called formshield
>>
>>
>> 10 or 20 mm thickness
>>
>>
>> Available from building supplies.
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On 15/07/2013, at 9:21 PM, HamishD <dobson_hamish@yahoo.com.au> wrote:
>>
>>
>> I don't know it's name but I will call the place tomorrow for u that I purchased it from. Then i will tell u.
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On 15/07/2013, at 9:19 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:
>>
>>
>> that sounds like the stuff people are refering to,what is it called and were can i get it from?
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> thank you for that Hamish
>>
>>
>> Jens
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Am 15.07.2013 um 21:15 schrieb HamishD:
>>
>>
>>
>> Interesting u ask.
>>
>> Only last week I was installing insulation that was self adhesive and recommended to me by my refrigeration guy as he uses it on air-conditioning ducting.
>>
>> I got it from a building supply store.
>> It was available in 12 or 20+ mm thickness. It was a grey foam that had a aluminium foil backing. The adhesive was extremely strong and basically if u stuffed it up and tried to remove it half remained glued to your shell.
>>
>> I will take pictures of it tomorrow.
>>
>> Hamish.
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On 15/07/2013, at 9:05 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:
>>
>> > hy there,
>> >
>> >
>> > i am planing on changing the insolation/fiberglass matting out of my Syncro. is there an Australian alternative to the widely available x-insolation.
>> > bunnings doesn't seem to have good materials available.
>> >
>> > clark rubber does but it's not self adhesive!
>> >
>> > what do the locals use?
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > any advice would help,
>> >
>> > regards
>> > Jens
>> >
>> > ------------------------------------
>> >
>> > Yahoo! Groups Links
>> >
>>
>>
>> Email sent using Optus Webmail
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>

Hi Jens,

Just about to do this Job myself.

Thanks for your info.  So let me get this straight..

First buy the 3mm Thick Roof Water Proofing material with Aluminium on the outside and self adhesive on inside.  How much of this do I need? You said 10m X 20cm..  Is that 10 Metres by 20cm?

Second  What type of foam did you use - Is that the Form shield?  4 metres worth of it right..

Thanks

 
Rowan Hardinge


Syncro Surfer Blog:
http://syncrosurfer.tumblr.com/


On Monday, 29 July 2013 8:26 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:


hi Peter and everyone els who was interested,



i finally finished this insolation project and would like to share some information.

i was experimenting with some foam and sound deadening materials after reserching on some german car audio forums. (don't know how i got there) 


to skin this cat, sound and thermal insolation you need two different materials.

one solid/heavy/non water drawing sheet against vibration and one for the thermal side of things.



the first layer needs to be applied to the naked panels and against the advise of the sound man in the local car audio store it is not necessary to cover the whole car from top to bottom with the "fat mat" sound deadening stuff for more then 1000$ but only in the middle of each panel to stop the vibrations/repercussions transmitted from driving and engine noises to come inside. at Bunnings you can find the same stuff for a freaction of the cost. it is used for roof water proofing and consists of some type of leathery/tary black 3mm thick sheet covered with aluminum foil and pressure adhesive glue. 10m x 20cm for 65$ was enough for the job. i used some residual over the engine bay to shut it  up a bit. it worked a treat. 



i found that the foam to be used should only be fairly rigid or stable but soft enough to get into the many gaps that you need to fill. it is of utmost importance that you have a solid contact with the panels and thus using a mat that is prepared with an adhesive layer works best. if you have stacks of time and you like sniffing patex for a few days you can save 10$ per square meter of mat and glue it in yourself.


the rule with this stuff is, the more the better, full contact and the last layer facing into the van should be an reflective foil of sorts. (keeps the cold/heat in) the trapped are in the foam keeps the hot panels from radiating its heat/cold into the van. the material i used was called FORMSHIELD and i got it for 39$ per running meter from clark rubber. i used 4meters for the entire van, covering the doors and all residual side panels.


the doors close quietly and the driving noises disappeared rapidly. 


i used the old fiberglass stuff to draw up pattens that fit brilliantly and these could be reused by anyone in the Forum.

attatched i have some pics for proof.



thanks for your ongoing support.
i hope i could give something back.



 

Am 16.07.2013 um 14:36 schrieb Peter Schweinsberg:

 
Insulation is insulation, and I have only talked insulation theory not building insulation.

Just don't use an insulation that will collapse or pack down like some bulk insulations ( fibreglass, rock wool, etc.)
Because they will pack down in a 4WD on corrugations.

They use polystyrene and similar in trucks and caravans.
They use rigid foam insulations in aeroplanes.
They use reflective insulations in space projects.

Brands I know nothing about,
but if it is advertised for a particular application,
it could be priced for the benefit of the vendor.

Peter



How about using insulation that is designed for cars, not houses? Dynamat etc.



----- Original Message -----
From:
Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com

To:
"Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
Cc:

Sent:
Tue, 16 Jul 2013 13:41:35 +1000
Subject:
Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] insolation / isolation


Â

Hi guys,
thought I'd come in on this, because I was once regarded an insulation guru.

First of all, I'm not aware that my Syncro has any, certainly none in the side panels.

There are fundamentally two types of insulation:
1. Reflective insulation
This works by reflecting electro magnetic radiation ( eg the rays of a hot surface ).
Also, reflective surfaces are not good at giving off heat.
Insulation with a reflective surface must have the reflective surface exposed to the air.
( A heap of reflective surfaces stacked on top of one another is only one reflective surface, the one exposed to the air.)

2. For want of another description: Bulk insulation
Examples: Fibre glass, polystyrene foam, sponge rubber.
These work best when the material itself is least conductive, and there are lots of little air spaces in the matrix.
Basic rule: the thicker bulk insulation is the more effective it is at insulation.

My favorite insulation, if I wanted to insulate the walls of my Syncro behind the linings:
Polystyrene:
It is available in a range of thicknesses so it can be bent around curved surfaces, can even be bought fire retarded.
It can be glued to it self and other surfaces. Contact adhesives work well once the smell has gone.
I would layer it and make sure the last layer had an Alfoil like surface facing air and the linings.

Hope this helps.

Peter




--Original Message Text---
From: HamishD
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2013 12:51:51 +1000



It's called formshield


10 or 20 mm thickness


Available from building supplies.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:21 PM, HamishD <dobson_hamish@yahoo.com.au> wrote:


I don't know it's name but I will call the place tomorrow for u that I purchased it from. Then i will tell u.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:19 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:


that sounds like the stuff people are refering to,what is it called and were can i get it from?




thank you for that Hamish


Jens







Am 15.07.2013 um 21:15 schrieb HamishD:



Interesting u ask.

Only last week I was installing insulation that was self adhesive and recommended to me by my refrigeration guy as he uses it on air-conditioning ducting.

I got it from a building supply store.
It was available in 12 or 20+ mm thickness. It was a grey foam that had a aluminium foil backing. The adhesive was extremely strong and basically if u stuffed it up and tried to remove it half remained glued to your shell.

I will take pictures of it tomorrow.

Hamish.


Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:05 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:

> hy there,
>
>
> i am planing on changing the insolation/fiberglass matting out of my Syncro. is there an Australian alternative to the widely available x-insolation.
> bunnings doesn't seem to have good materials available.
>
> clark rubber does but it's not self adhesive!
>
> what do the locals use?
>
>
>
> any advice would help,
>
> regards
> Jens
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>




















Email sent using Optus Webmail





How about using insulation that is designed for cars, not houses? Dynamat etc.



----- Original Message -----
From:
Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com

To:
"Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
Cc:

Sent:
Tue, 16 Jul 2013 13:41:35 +1000
Subject:
Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] insolation / isolation


Â

Hi guys,
thought I'd come in on this, because I was once regarded an insulation guru.

First of all, I'm not aware that my Syncro has any, certainly none in the side panels.

There are fundamentally two types of insulation:
1. Reflective insulation
This works by reflecting electro magnetic radiation ( eg the rays of a hot surface ).
Also, reflective surfaces are not good at giving off heat.
Insulation with a reflective surface must have the reflective surface exposed to the air.
( A heap of reflective surfaces stacked on top of one another is only one reflective surface, the one exposed to the air.)

2. For want of another description: Bulk insulation
Examples: Fibre glass, polystyrene foam, sponge rubber.
These work best when the material itself is least conductive, and there are lots of little air spaces in the matrix.
Basic rule: the thicker bulk insulation is the more effective it is at insulation.

My favorite insulation, if I wanted to insulate the walls of my Syncro behind the linings:
Polystyrene:
It is available in a range of thicknesses so it can be bent around curved surfaces, can even be bought fire retarded.
It can be glued to it self and other surfaces. Contact adhesives work well once the smell has gone.
I would layer it and make sure the last layer had an Alfoil like surface facing air and the linings.

Hope this helps.

Peter




--Original Message Text---
From: HamishD
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2013 12:51:51 +1000



It's called formshield


10 or 20 mm thickness


Available from building supplies.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:21 PM, HamishD <dobson_hamish@yahoo.com.au> wrote:


I don't know it's name but I will call the place tomorrow for u that I purchased it from. Then i will tell u.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:19 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:


that sounds like the stuff people are refering to,what is it called and were can i get it from?




thank you for that Hamish


Jens







Am 15.07.2013 um 21:15 schrieb HamishD:



Interesting u ask.

Only last week I was installing insulation that was self adhesive and recommended to me by my refrigeration guy as he uses it on air-conditioning ducting.

I got it from a building supply store.
It was available in 12 or 20+ mm thickness. It was a grey foam that had a aluminium foil backing. The adhesive was extremely strong and basically if u stuffed it up and tried to remove it half remained glued to your shell.

I will take pictures of it tomorrow.

Hamish.


Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:05 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:

> hy there,
>
>
> i am planing on changing the insolation/fiberglass matting out of my Syncro. is there an Australian alternative to the widely available x-insolation.
> bunnings doesn't seem to have good materials available.
>
> clark rubber does but it's not self adhesive!
>
> what do the locals use?
>
>
>
> any advice would help,
>
> regards
> Jens
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>


Email sent using Optus Webmail








Hi Rowan,

The aluminium "tar/ bitumen type" tape I got from Bunnings, 10meter was enough. I followed the instruction from an Auto Audio specialist that said it only needs to be placed in the middle of the panels. You can see in the pictures that I wasn't to particular about the first layer and it's placing. 

The insulation foam I got from Clark rubber, I used the 20mm form shield. That stuff sticks like shit to a blanket!!! My tip, Make paper patterns as precise as possible before attempting to glue them into the holes. 
4meters were enough for me.  On a side note I didn't do the front doors and I only had 5cm of the stuff left over...

Good luck with this one, lots of sharp edges in those panels! 


Regards, Jens 



Sent from my iPad

On 24.06.2014, at 20:46, "Rowan Hardinge rowan.hardinge@yahoo.com [Syncro_T3_Australia]" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

 

Hi Jens,

Just about to do this Job myself.

Thanks for your info.  So let me get this straight..

First buy the 3mm Thick Roof Water Proofing material with Aluminium on the outside and self adhesive on inside.  How much of this do I need? You said 10m X 20cm..  Is that 10 Metres by 20cm?

Second  What type of foam did you use - Is that the Form shield?  4 metres worth of it right..

Thanks

 
Rowan Hardinge




On Monday, 29 July 2013 8:26 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:


hi Peter and everyone els who was interested,



i finally finished this insolation project and would like to share some information.

i was experimenting with some foam and sound deadening materials after reserching on some german car audio forums. (don't know how i got there) 


to skin this cat, sound and thermal insolation you need two different materials.

one solid/heavy/non water drawing sheet against vibration and one for the thermal side of things.



the first layer needs to be applied to the naked panels and against the advise of the sound man in the local car audio store it is not necessary to cover the whole car from top to bottom with the "fat mat" sound deadening stuff for more then 1000$ but only in the middle of each panel to stop the vibrations/repercussions transmitted from driving and engine noises to come inside. at Bunnings you can find the same stuff for a freaction of the cost. it is used for roof water proofing and consists of some type of leathery/tary black 3mm thick sheet covered with aluminum foil and pressure adhesive glue. 10m x 20cm for 65$ was enough for the job. i used some residual over the engine bay to shut it  up a bit. it worked a treat. 



i found that the foam to be used should only be fairly rigid or stable but soft enough to get into the many gaps that you need to fill. it is of utmost importance that you have a solid contact with the panels and thus using a mat that is prepared with an adhesive layer works best. if you have stacks of time and you like sniffing patex for a few days you can save 10$ per square meter of mat and glue it in yourself.


the rule with this stuff is, the more the better, full contact and the last layer facing into the van should be an reflective foil of sorts. (keeps the cold/heat in) the trapped are in the foam keeps the hot panels from radiating its heat/cold into the van. the material i used was called FORMSHIELD and i got it for 39$ per running meter from clark rubber. i used 4meters for the entire van, covering the doors and all residual side panels.


the doors close quietly and the driving noises disappeared rapidly. 


i used the old fiberglass stuff to draw up pattens that fit brilliantly and these could be reused by anyone in the Forum.

attatched i have some pics for proof.



thanks for your ongoing support.
i hope i could give something back.

<Bild.jpeg><Bild 1.jpeg><Bild 2.jpeg><Bild 3.jpeg><Bild 4.jpeg>


 

Am 16.07.2013 um 14:36 schrieb Peter Schweinsberg:

 
Insulation is insulation, and I have only talked insulation theory not building insulation.

Just don't use an insulation that will collapse or pack down like some bulk insulations ( fibreglass, rock wool, etc.)
Because they will pack down in a 4WD on corrugations.

They use polystyrene and similar in trucks and caravans.
They use rigid foam insulations in aeroplanes.
They use reflective insulations in space projects.

Brands I know nothing about,
but if it is advertised for a particular application,
it could be priced for the benefit of the vendor.

Peter



How about using insulation that is designed for cars, not houses? Dynamat etc.



----- Original Message -----
From:
Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com

To:
"Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
Cc:

Sent:
Tue, 16 Jul 2013 13:41:35 +1000
Subject:
Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] insolation / isolation


Â

Hi guys,
thought I'd come in on this, because I was once regarded an insulation guru.

First of all, I'm not aware that my Syncro has any, certainly none in the side panels.

There are fundamentally two types of insulation:
1. Reflective insulation
This works by reflecting electro magnetic radiation ( eg the rays of a hot surface ).
Also, reflective surfaces are not good at giving off heat.
Insulation with a reflective surface must have the reflective surface exposed to the air.
( A heap of reflective surfaces stacked on top of one another is only one reflective surface, the one exposed to the air.)

2. For want of another description: Bulk insulation
Examples: Fibre glass, polystyrene foam, sponge rubber.
These work best when the material itself is least conductive, and there are lots of little air spaces in the matrix.
Basic rule: the thicker bulk insulation is the more effective it is at insulation.

My favorite insulation, if I wanted to insulate the walls of my Syncro behind the linings:
Polystyrene:
It is available in a range of thicknesses so it can be bent around curved surfaces, can even be bought fire retarded.
It can be glued to it self and other surfaces. Contact adhesives work well once the smell has gone.
I would layer it and make sure the last layer had an Alfoil like surface facing air and the linings.

Hope this helps.

Peter




--Original Message Text---
From: HamishD
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2013 12:51:51 +1000



It's called formshield


10 or 20 mm thickness


Available from building supplies.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:21 PM, HamishD <dobson_hamish@yahoo.com.au> wrote:


I don't know it's name but I will call the place tomorrow for u that I purchased it from. Then i will tell u.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:19 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:


that sounds like the stuff people are refering to,what is it called and were can i get it from?




thank you for that Hamish


Jens







Am 15.07.2013 um 21:15 schrieb HamishD:



Interesting u ask.

Only last week I was installing insulation that was self adhesive and recommended to me by my refrigeration guy as he uses it on air-conditioning ducting.

I got it from a building supply store.
It was available in 12 or 20+ mm thickness. It was a grey foam that had a aluminium foil backing. The adhesive was extremely strong and basically if u stuffed it up and tried to remove it half remained glued to your shell.

I will take pictures of it tomorrow.

Hamish.


Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:05 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:

> hy there,
>
>
> i am planing on changing the insolation/fiberglass matting out of my Syncro. is there an Australian alternative to the widely available x-insolation.
> bunnings doesn't seem to have good materials available.
>
> clark rubber does but it's not self adhesive!
>
> what do the locals use?
>
>
>
> any advice would help,
>
> regards
> Jens
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>




















Email sent using Optus Webmail





How about using insulation that is designed for cars, not houses? Dynamat etc.



----- Original Message -----
From:
Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com

To:
"Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
Cc:

Sent:
Tue, 16 Jul 2013 13:41:35 +1000
Subject:
Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] insolation / isolation


Â

Hi guys,
thought I'd come in on this, because I was once regarded an insulation guru.

First of all, I'm not aware that my Syncro has any, certainly none in the side panels.

There are fundamentally two types of insulation:
1. Reflective insulation
This works by reflecting electro magnetic radiation ( eg the rays of a hot surface ).
Also, reflective surfaces are not good at giving off heat.
Insulation with a reflective surface must have the reflective surface exposed to the air.
( A heap of reflective surfaces stacked on top of one another is only one reflective surface, the one exposed to the air.)

2. For want of another description: Bulk insulation
Examples: Fibre glass, polystyrene foam, sponge rubber.
These work best when the material itself is least conductive, and there are lots of little air spaces in the matrix.
Basic rule: the thicker bulk insulation is the more effective it is at insulation.

My favorite insulation, if I wanted to insulate the walls of my Syncro behind the linings:
Polystyrene:
It is available in a range of thicknesses so it can be bent around curved surfaces, can even be bought fire retarded.
It can be glued to it self and other surfaces. Contact adhesives work well once the smell has gone.
I would layer it and make sure the last layer had an Alfoil like surface facing air and the linings.

Hope this helps.

Peter




--Original Message Text---
From: HamishD
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2013 12:51:51 +1000



It's called formshield


10 or 20 mm thickness


Available from building supplies.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:21 PM, HamishD <dobson_hamish@yahoo.com.au> wrote:


I don't know it's name but I will call the place tomorrow for u that I purchased it from. Then i will tell u.

Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:19 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:


that sounds like the stuff people are refering to,what is it called and were can i get it from?




thank you for that Hamish


Jens







Am 15.07.2013 um 21:15 schrieb HamishD:



Interesting u ask.

Only last week I was installing insulation that was self adhesive and recommended to me by my refrigeration guy as he uses it on air-conditioning ducting.

I got it from a building supply store.
It was available in 12 or 20+ mm thickness. It was a grey foam that had a aluminium foil backing. The adhesive was extremely strong and basically if u stuffed it up and tried to remove it half remained glued to your shell.

I will take pictures of it tomorrow.

Hamish.


Sent from my iPhone

On 15/07/2013, at 9:05 PM, Jens Baufeldt <jens.baufeldt@me.com> wrote:

> hy there,
>
>
> i am planing on changing the insolation/fiberglass matting out of my Syncro. is there an Australian alternative to the widely available x-insolation.
> bunnings doesn't seem to have good materials available.
>
> clark rubber does but it's not self adhesive!
>
> what do the locals use?
>
>
>
> any advice would help,
>
> regards
> Jens
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>


Email sent using Optus Webmail