re: R&R the tailpipe

All,
 
Concerning removing the frozen in place 3 x M8 tailpipe hex head fixing bolts, immediate thoughts are heating them up with an oxy set to see if they'll shift. Failing that, drill each out centrally just enough and try to extract or get back to/retap the flange threads or else clear out the threads altogether and just install bolts and nuts.
 
Any more ideas please how best to tackle this one? TIA.
 
Cheers.
 
Ken


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Ken,

I had the same problem last week I used an Impact Driver, hard work
but I got it off eventually

Cheers

Theo
.
Option 1 Some light oil on the threads overnight followed by gentle pressure to try to crack the rust (wirebrush the exposed threads first) and then unscrew

Option 2 Heat and then impact driver

Option 3 Swearing, cursing, drinking tea

Option 4 Remove two followed by shearing off number 3.

Good luck, i had to remove the entire exhaust system including the manifold on my diesel recently and was amazed the bolts all came out including the turbo so you might be lucky.

Gary


On 03/03/2010, at 9:59 AM, Theo Weiss wrote:

 

Ken,

I had the same problem last week I used an Impact Driver, hard work
but I got it off eventually

Cheers

Theo
.


Great video!

--- In Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com, Gary Cookson <gary@...> wrote:
>
> Option 1 Some light oil on the threads overnight followed by gentle pressure to try to crack the rust (wirebrush the exposed threads first) and then unscrew
>
> Option 2 Heat and then impact driver
>
> Option 3 Swearing, cursing, drinking tea
>
> Option 4 Remove two followed by shearing off number 3.
>
> Good luck, i had to remove the entire exhaust system including the manifold on my diesel recently and was amazed the bolts all came out including the turbo so you might be lucky.
>
> Gary
>
>
> On 03/03/2010, at 9:59 AM, Theo Weiss wrote:
>
> > Ken,
> >
> > I had the same problem last week I used an Impact Driver, hard work
> > but I got it off eventually
> >
> > Cheers
> >
> > Theo
> > .
> >
> >
>
Gary and Theo and ALL,
You should see my garage and workshop at the moment. Absolutely littered with all manner of tools and equipment, all because I thought I'd try the best (meaning easiest) option first but then having to drag out more and more as I was forced to change tactics as I worked my way down the increasingly harder options list.
 
This is all with the muffler and tailpipe still in place. I found this project more easily done with the van sitting on the ground .. not jacked up.
 
For my 3 frozen flange bolts that needed removing first, not any of applied heat, penetrating fluid nor extractors worked. I chickened out on using the impact wrench/hammer combo for fear the impacting would have caused damage to the muffler.
 
I also strongly feared snapping an extractor in the drilled hole in any of the 3 bolts. What happens then if you can't remove the remains of the extractor? I shudder to think.
 
So finally I got down the list to the 2nd last option. First I cut off the pipe to get at the bolts, then I wrenched off the 3 bolt heads, cut off the residual bolts on BOTH sides of the muffler flange using a 4" grinder (getting at the backside ones was interesting :-)), then drilled out the bolts to below thread size and then recut the 3 threads to the original M8 x 1.25 pitch. Worked perfectly.
 
My last option had the rethreading failed was to drill the holes larger and install nuts at the back of the flange, but I really didn't want to do that because if the new bolts also eventually froze up as well, I'd be stuck with how to remove the 3 bolts and nuts at the back of the muffler flange? I don't want to go there .. haha
 
The other interesting win win thing I discovered with researching this tailpipe project for the first time was the discovery that the old tailpipe was the wrong one anyway. This now explains why when I drop the drivers side rear wheel into a rut or ditch, on occasions the end of the tailpipe would ground. I suspect the tailpipe was either a dodgy made up one or else it's the one for the 2WD T3.
 
So now I have what appears to be a near copy of the original OEM tailpipe ... made in Denmark and meant for the syncro. It's claimed that this pipe is shaped in such a way as to delay the entry of water into the muffler during wading as it bends higher before dropping. Also this tailpipe finishes not only 25mm higher than the old one but also at least 25mm inwards than before. These two improvements will help a lot with placing the tailpipe end out of the zone of the departure angle. So I'm very happy about that.
 
If anyone was interested, I could possibly provide a few comparative pics of the old and new tailpipes.
 
So my last question. Would it be useful then for the long term to install stainless steel bolts instead or are there some even worse heat/expansion/contraction/corrosion issues when mixing different steels in an exhaust system? TIA.
 
Cheers.
 
Ken  
 

 

To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
From: gary@twentytwentyone.net
Date: Wed, 3 Mar 2010 11:05:20 +1100
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Re: R&R the tailpipe

 
Option 1 Some light oil on the threads overnight followed by gentle pressure to try to crack the rust (wirebrush the exposed threads first) and then unscrew

Option 2 Heat and then impact driver

Option 3 Swearing, cursing, drinking tea

Option 4 Remove two followed by shearing off number 3.

Good luck, i had to remove the entire exhaust system including the manifold on my diesel recently and was amazed the bolts all came out including the turbo so you might be lucky.

Gary


On 03/03/2010, at 9:59 AM, Theo Weiss wrote:

 

Ken,

I had the same problem last week I used an Impact Driver, hard work
but I got it off eventually

Cheers

Theo
.






Meet local singles online. Browse profiles for FREE!

Ken,

In circumstances similar to yours, I have many times in the past resorted to using a small engraver and rotary stone.  (I have a Dremel but cheap engravers can be had at Bunnings for a ridiculously small amount of money.)  I grind one side away until I just expose the threads of the stud.  One gentle tap of a cold chisel will split the nut off the stud.  This leaves the stud untouched and ready for a new nut.

Les

 


From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com [mailto: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Ken Garratt
Sent: 05 March 2010 11:04
To: Syncro _T3_Australia forum
Subject: RE: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Re: R&R the tailpipe

Gary and Theo and ALL,
You should see my garage and workshop at the moment. Absolutely littered with all manner of tools and equipment, all because I thought I'd try the best (meaning easiest) option first but then having to drag out more and more as I was forced to change tactics as I worked my way down the increasingly harder options list.
 

I meant to say “grind away one side of the nut…”

 


From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com [mailto: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Les Harris
Sent: 05 March 2010 12:19
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Re: R&R the tailpipe

 

 

Ken,

In circumstances similar to yours, I have many times in the past resorted to using a small engraver and rotary stone.  (I have a Dremel but cheap engravers can be had at Bunnings for a ridiculously small amount of money.)  I grind one side away until I just expose the threads of the stud.  One gentle tap of a cold chisel will split the nut off the stud.  This leaves the stud untouched and ready for a new nut.

Les

 


From: Syncro_T3_Australia @yahoogroups. com [mailto: Syncro_T3_Australia @yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of Ken Garratt
Sent: 05 March 2010 11:04
To: Syncro _T3_Australia forum
Subject: RE: [Syncro_T3_Australi a] Re: R&R the tailpipe

Gary and Theo and ALL,
You should see my garage and workshop at the moment. Absolutely littered with all manner of tools and equipment, all because I thought I'd try the best (meaning easiest) option first but then having to drag out more and more as I was forced to change tactics as I worked my way down the increasingly harder options list.
 


I don't even have a Vee Dub donk in my syncro and I am interested in photos of your toils Ken.
 
Cheers,
 
Scott
 
 
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, March 05, 2010 11:04 AM
Subject: RE: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Re: R&R the tailpipe

 

Gary and Theo and ALL,
You should see my garage and workshop at the moment. Absolutely littered with all manner of tools and equipment, all because I thought I'd try the best (meaning easiest) option first but then having to drag out more and more as I was forced to change tactics as I worked my way down the increasingly harder options list.
 
This is all with the muffler and tailpipe still in place. I found this project more easily done with the van sitting on the ground .. not jacked up.
 
For my 3 frozen flange bolts that needed removing first, not any of applied heat, penetrating fluid nor extractors worked. I chickened out on using the impact wrench/hammer combo for fear the impacting would have caused damage to the muffler.
 
I also strongly feared snapping an extractor in the drilled hole in any of the 3 bolts. What happens then if you can't remove the remains of the extractor? I shudder to think.
 
So finally I got down the list to the 2nd last option. First I cut off the pipe to get at the bolts, then I wrenched off the 3 bolt heads, cut off the residual bolts on BOTH sides of the muffler flange using a 4" grinder (getting at the backside ones was interesting :-)), then drilled out the bolts to below thread size and then recut the 3 threads to the original M8 x 1.25 pitch. Worked perfectly.
 
My last option had the rethreading failed was to drill the holes larger and install nuts at the back of the flange, but I really didn't want to do that because if the new bolts also eventually froze up as well, I'd be stuck with how to remove the 3 bolts and nuts at the back of the muffler flange? I don't want to go there .. haha
 
The other interesting win win thing I discovered with researching this tailpipe project for the first time was the discovery that the old tailpipe was the wrong one anyway. This now explains why when I drop the drivers side rear wheel into a rut or ditch, on occasions the end of the tailpipe would ground. I suspect the tailpipe was either a dodgy made up one or else it's the one for the 2WD T3.
 
So now I have what appears to be a near copy of the original OEM tailpipe ... made in Denmark and meant for the syncro. It's claimed that this pipe is shaped in such a way as to delay the entry of water into the muffler during wading as it bends higher before dropping. Also this tailpipe finishes not only 25mm higher than the old one but also at least 25mm inwards than before. These two improvements will help a lot with placing the tailpipe end out of the zone of the departure angle. So I'm very happy about that.
 
If anyone was interested, I could possibly provide a few comparative pics of the old and new tailpipes.
 
So my last question. Would it be useful then for the long term to install stainless steel bolts instead or are there some even worse heat/expansion/ contraction/ corrosion issues when mixing different steels in an exhaust system? TIA.
 
Cheers.
 
Ken  
 

 


To: Syncro_T3_Australia @yahoogroups. com
From: gary@twentytwentyon e.net
Date: Wed, 3 Mar 2010 11:05:20 +1100
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australi a] Re: R&R the tailpipe

 
Option 1 Some light oil on the threads overnight followed by gentle pressure to try to crack the rust (wirebrush the exposed threads first) and then unscrew

Option 2 Heat and then impact driver

Option 3 Swearing, cursing, drinking tea

Option 4 Remove two followed by shearing off number 3.

Good luck, i had to remove the entire exhaust system including the manifold on my diesel recently and was amazed the bolts all came out including the turbo so you might be lucky.

Gary


On 03/03/2010, at 9:59 AM, Theo Weiss wrote:

 

Ken,

I had the same problem last week I used an Impact Driver, hard work
but I got it off eventually

Cheers

Theo
.






Meet local singles online. Browse profiles for FREE!