Solid shaft drives

Ken,
 
The term "solid shaft", as it used on most of the world Syncro websites, refers to a drive that does not have a VC. 
 
The drive line from the gearbox forward to the front diff has three elements.  There is a short internal shaft in the front of the gearbox, then the visible propshaft (which has a universal joint at each end), then the internal shaft in the front diff housing which drives the front pinion gear.  The VC lives in the front diff housing and is normally on this third element.  A "solid shaft" drive replaces the VC with a shaft, with the result that the front pinion gear runs at the same speed as the main pinion gear in the gearbox.
 
I understand that the first prototype Syncros had a solid shaft drive and decoupler but Steyr Puch discarded that in favour of the VC drive for production
 
Les
----- Original Message -----
From: Ken
Sent: Friday, May 12, 2006 3:03 AM
Subject: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Re: Pros and cons of a solid drive


Gday Les,

Am I talking here about the same thing as you or not please?

Gday Les,

Yes what you say is consistant with what's here in the publication ...
all of the detail in it still seems relevant today except being too
early for the 2.1 litre motor to get a showing. Interesting though, the
fact there is enough detail in this Self Study publication, in
particular that it includes the detail about the solid shaft, suggests
they went further than just prototypes. This publication certainly isn't
a draft. Obviously then there are people around still chewing the fat
about solid shaft possibilities.

Cheers and thanks Les

Ken


--- In Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com, "leslie harris"
<leslieharris@...> wrote:
>
> Ken,
>
> The term "solid shaft", as it used on most of the world Syncro
websites, refers to a drive that does not have a VC.
>
> The drive line from the gearbox forward to the front diff has three
elements. There is a short internal shaft in the front of the gearbox,
then the visible propshaft (which has a universal joint at each end),
then the internal shaft in the front diff housing which drives the front
pinion gear. The VC lives in the front diff housing and is normally on
this third element. A "solid shaft" drive replaces the VC with a shaft,
with the result that the front pinion gear runs at the same speed as the
main pinion gear in the gearbox.
>
> I understand that the first prototype Syncros had a solid shaft drive
and decoupler but Steyr Puch discarded that in favour of the VC drive
for production
>
> Les
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Ken
> To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
> Sent: Friday, May 12, 2006 3:03 AM
> Subject: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Re: Pros and cons of a solid drive
>
>
>
> Gday Les,
>
> Am I talking here about the same thing as you or not please?
>
Ken,
 
It might have gone into early production.  Phill would probably know.
 
Les
----- Original Message -----
From: Ken
Sent: Friday, May 12, 2006 12:53 PM
Subject: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Re: Solid shaft drives


Gday Les,

Yes what you say is consistant with what's here in the publication ...
all of the detail in it still seems relevant today except being too
early for the 2.1 litre motor to get a showing. Interesting though, the
fact there is enough detail in this Self Study publication, in
particular that it includes the detail about the solid shaft, suggests
they went further than just prototypes. This publication certainly isn't
a draft. Obviously then there are people around still chewing the fat
about solid shaft possibilities.

Cheers and thanks Les

Ken