Alan Turing

This is well off topic but for those with enquiring minds, this is Alan Turing's 100th birthday.

  http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2012/jun/23/alan-turing-honoured-google-doodle

Les

Good one Les. There are undoubtedly amazing enquiring minds around that are so far above most of us.However I do feel we have members on this site who are close to cracking the gene code of the mysterious syncro.
This plodder however can only pedantically enquire how in your following report Turing could have worked after the war when he is said to have killed himself 2 years after 1942.
 
"After the war, Turing worked at the National Physical Laboratory and the University of Manchester.
In 1942, Turing was found guilty of homosexuality. He agreed to be chemically castrated which entailed being given female hormones. Two years later he killed himself at the age of 41."
 
The answer was in the different article on the same page which succinctly summed up his life and showed up the typographical error as he in fact died in 1954 according to the excellent video which I think is worth 5 minutes of anyone's time.
 
"Alan Turing: the short, brilliant life and tragic death of an enigma"
 
I found much to interest me in the article as I remember being taken by my parents to the Festival of Britain in 1951 on the banks of the Thames near Westminster Bridge. Only the Festival Hall remains of the exhibits. In addition when I was in London last year I visited the Science Museum and saw some of these early computers (Melbourne Museum also claims an early breakthrough) and photographed (poorly because of the light and reflections) these now collector piece BMW and Messerschmitt vehicles which were very popular in Britain in the 50's. I sometimes wonder if their time could come again as city cars with updated polution free power units and better pasenger protection.
Your posting obviously triggered many memories for me. Thanks
Roger
Melbourne

 
--- On Sat, 23/6/12, syncroaustralia <leslieharris@optusnet.com.au> wrote:

From: syncroaustralia <leslieharris@optusnet.com.au>
Subject: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Alan Turing
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Received: Saturday, 23 June, 2012, 10:43 AM

 
This is well off topic but for those with enquiring minds, this is Alan Turing's 100th birthday.
Les
Guilty of homosexuality yet a genius. Reminds me of Oscar Wilde who when asked by Customs if he had anything to declare replied "Only my genius "
When will we stop persecuting minorities ? Syncro drivers should be a protected species for their endeavours to keep an old German bus on the road ( or off the road ).

Mark

Roger,

I have driven both of these vehicles.  The Messerschmitt had a very unusual feature – it did not have reverse gear!!  In fact, it didn’t have a starter motor as such.  It had a Sachs Dynastart, which was a flywheel alternator.  When the engine was running, it provided electric power to the vehicle.  To start the engine, battery power was applied to the alternator. 

To reverse the vehicle, the driver flipped a switch, which stopped the engine, reversed the polarity of the alternator and restarted the engine – running backwards!  One then had four reverse speeds and I actually saw one being driven at about 30MPH along Epping Road – in reverse!

The BMW Isetta was a very practical vehicle, powered by the 250cc single cylinder BMW motorcycle engine and it got along quite smartly in traffic.  For about a year, I drove a Goggo Dart and that thing went like a hairy goat in traffic.  From memory, it was only a 400cc twin two stroke engine but, because of the very light weight, nothing could keep up with it up to about 40MPH.  Manoeuvreability was quite good and it was a lot of fun to drive.

Speaking of the 250 BMW motorcycle, I own a 1954 model which I bought in about 1956 with 11,000 on the clock.  It now has a grand total of 22,000 miles on the clock! 

Les


From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Roger Bell
Sent: 24 June 2012 00:21
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Alan Turing

 

 

. . . photographed (poorly because of the light and reflections) these now collector piece BMW and Messerschmitt vehicles which were very popular in Britain in the 50's. I sometimes wonder if their time could come again as city cars with updated pollution free power units and better passenger protection.

Your posting obviously triggered many memories for me. Thanks

Roger

Melbourne

Mark,

Indeed, sad stuff.  It is a moot point how long WWII would have gone on had it not been for Turing’s mathematical code breaking brilliance.  (I correspond with an armed services security man in the UK who trained at Bletchley Park and he knows a lot more than most people about Turing.

Les


From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of mark
Sent: 24 June 2012 09:56
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Re: Alan Turing

 

Guilty of homosexuality yet a genius. Reminds me of Oscar Wilde who when asked by Customs if he had anything to declare replied "Only my genius "
When will we stop persecuting minorities ? Syncro drivers should be a protected species for their endeavours to keep an old German bus on the road ( or off the road ).
Mark

Did anyone see the docco on TV about him a few weeks ago?

Phill



> Les Harris <leslieharris@optusnet.com.au> wrote:
>
> Mark,
>
> Indeed, sad stuff. It is a moot point how long WWII would have gone on
> had
> it not been for Turing's mathematical code breaking brilliance. (I
> correspond with an armed services security man in the UK who trained at
> Bletchley Park and he knows a lot more than most people about Turing.
>
> Les
>
> _____
>
> From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
> [mailto:Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of mark
> Sent: 24 June 2012 09:56
> To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
> Subject: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Re: Alan Turing
>
>
>
> Guilty of homosexuality yet a genius. Reminds me of Oscar Wilde who when
> asked by Customs if he had anything to declare replied "Only my genius "
> When will we stop persecuting minorities ? Syncro drivers should be a
> protected species for their endeavours to keep an old German bus on the
> road
> ( or off the road ).
> Mark

Phill,

No, missed that.  Any idea what channel?

L


From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of plander@optusnet.com.au
Sent: 24 June 2012 11:24
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: RE: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Re: Alan Turing

Did anyone see the docco on TV about him a few weeks ago?
Phill


>I correspond with an armed services security man in the UK who trained at
> Bletchley Park and he knows a lot more than most people about Turing.
>
> Les
>


Bletchley Park really is worth a visit for anyone going to Britain. We spent a day there and were lucky enough to meet one of the original engineers there working.

Phill
It was called "Codebreakers" or similar. If I still have it on the hard drive I'll DVD it for you.

Phill



> Les Harris <leslieharris@optusnet.com.au> wrote:
>
> Phill,
>
> No, missed that. Any idea what channel?
>
> L
>
> _____
>
> From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
> [mailto:Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
> plander@optusnet.com.au
> Sent: 24 June 2012 11:24
> To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
> Subject: Re: RE: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Re: Alan Turing
>
> Did anyone see the docco on TV about him a few weeks ago?
> Phill

Phill,

That would be great!   Many thanks!

Les


From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of plander@optusnet.com.au
Sent: 24 June 2012 11:28
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: RE: RE: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Re: Alan Turing

It was called "Codebreakers" or similar. If I still have it on the hard drive I'll DVD it for you.
Phill

Yes, I've still got it. It runs for 55mins and was on SBS.

Phill



> Les Harris <leslieharris@optusnet.com.au> wrote:
>
> Phill,
>
> That would be great! Many thanks!
>
> Les
>
> _____
>
> From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
> [mailto:Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
> plander@optusnet.com.au
> Sent: 24 June 2012 11:28
> To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
> Subject: Re: RE: RE: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Re: Alan Turing
>
> It was called "Codebreakers" or similar. If I still have it on the hard
> drive I'll DVD it for you.
> Phill

Great, thanks!

L

 


From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of plander@optusnet.com.au
Sent: 24 June 2012 11:57
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: RE: RE: RE: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Re: Alan Turing

 

 

Yes, I've still got it. It runs for 55mins and was on SBS.

Phill


Les-
1.It had a Sachs Dynastart, which was a flywheel alternator. When the engine was running, it provided electric power to the vehicle. To start the engine, battery power was applied to the alternator.
 Didn't the Haflinger also have a similar starter/dynamo arrangement?
2.

The BMW Isetta was a very practical vehicle, powered by the 250cc single cylinder BMW motorcycle engine and it got along quite smartly in traffic. For about a year, I drove a Goggo Dart and that thing went like a hairy goat in traffic. From memory, it was only a 400cc twin two stroke engine but, because of the very light weight, nothing could keep up with it up to about 40MPH. Manoeuvreability was quite good and it was a lot of fun to drive.

40mph!   seems you weren't really trying although the Geelong road doesn't quite compare with Hockenheimring.
"24-hour record run
In 1955, in order to prove the KR200's durability, Messerschmitt prepared a KR200 to break the 24-hour speed record for three-wheeled vehicles under 250 cc (15.3 cu in). The record car had a special single-seat low-drag body and a highly modified engine, but the suspension, steering, and braking components were stock. Throttle, brake, and clutch cables were duplicated. The record car was run at the Hockenheimring for 24 hours and broke 22 international speed records in its class, including the 24-hour speed record, which it set at 103 km/h (64 mph)[6][12]"( - from Wikipedia)
 
Also didn't the late Peter Wherret's TV Car show in the 80's?? start with film of the Messerschmitt?
 
3. 

Speaking of the 250 BMW motorcycle, I own a 1954 model which I bought in about 1956 with 11,000 on the clock. It now has a grand total of 22,000 miles on the clock!

1954 BMW motocycle with grand total of 22,000 miles. Les you are going to have to get out more.
 
 4. I thought I remembered previously hearing something of Alan Turing - This is a transcript of the Radio National Science program which featured him. 
Finally well said Mark -when you look at the breadth and depth of his achievements his was such  a tragic unnecessary loss to the world due to bigotry.I can only again quote Oscar Wilde "some bring happiness wherever they go. Others whenever they go" I think Alan Turing would surely not be in the latter group.
 
Roger

Yes, the Haflinger had/has (I've got two) a Dynastarter (combination starter motor/generator).

 

Peter.

 

 

From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Roger Bell
Sent: Sunday, 24 June 2012 9:25 PM
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Alan Turing

 

 

Les-

1.It had a Sachs Dynastart, which was a flywheel alternator. When the engine was running, it provided electric power to the vehicle. To start the engine, battery power was applied to the alternator.

 Didn't the Haflinger also have a similar starter/dynamo arrangement?

2.

The BMW Isetta was a very practical vehicle, powered by the 250cc single cylinder BMW motorcycle engine and it got along quite smartly in traffic. For about a year, I drove a Goggo Dart and that thing went like a hairy goat in traffic. From memory, it was only a 400cc twin two stroke engine but, because of the very light weight, nothing could keep up with it up to about 40MPH. Manoeuvreability was quite good and it was a lot of fun to drive.

40mph!   seems you weren't really trying although the Geelong road doesn't quite compare with Hockenheimring.

"24-hour record run

In 1955, in order to prove the KR200's durability, Messerschmitt prepared a KR200 to break the 24-hour speed record for three-wheeled vehicles under 250 cc (15.3 cu in). The record car had a special single-seat low-drag body and a highly modified engine, but the suspension, steering, and braking components were stock. Throttle, brake, and clutch cables were duplicated. The record car was run at the Hockenheimring for 24 hours and broke 22 international speed records in its class, including the 24-hour speed record, which it set at 103 km/h (64 mph)[6][12]"( - from Wikipedia)

 

Also didn't the late Peter Wherret's TV Car show in the 80's?? start with film of the Messerschmitt?

 

3. 

Speaking of the 250 BMW motorcycle, I own a 1954 model which I bought in about 1956 with 11,000 on the clock. It now has a grand total of 22,000 miles on the clock!

1954 BMW motocycle with grand total of 22,000 miles. Les you are going to have to get out more.

 

 4. I thought I remembered previously hearing something of Alan Turing - This is a transcript of the Radio National Science program which featured him. 

Finally well said Mark -when you look at the breadth and depth of his achievements his was such  a tragic unnecessary loss to the world due to bigotry.I can only again quote Oscar Wilde "some bring happiness wherever they go. Others whenever they go" I think Alan Turing would surely not be in the latter group.

 

Roger

Yo Peter!!  Glad to see that you are still keeping track of us!!

Les

 


From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Peter Farrer
Sent: 24 June 2012 21:42
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Alan Turing

Yes, the Haflinger had/has (I've got two) a Dynastarter (combination starter motor/generator)

Peter.

 

G'Day Les,

 

Yes still following the discussions on the forum.....always interesting.

 

I'm still rebuilding the 718 Pinzgauer....."may" go to the factory in Austria in August so there is the possibility of getting some Syncro pics, info, etc which I'II pass on if I do.

 

Peter.

 

From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Les Harris
Sent: Sunday, 24 June 2012 10:08 PM
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Alan Turing

 

 

Yo Peter!!  Glad to see that you are still keeping track of us!!

Les

 


From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Peter Farrer
Sent: 24 June 2012 21:42
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Alan Turing

Yes, the Haflinger had/has (I've got two) a Dynastarter (combination starter motor/generator)

Peter.

 

Peter,

Look forward to that!

Les


From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Peter Farrer
Sent: 24 June 2012 22:31
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Alan Turing
 

 

G'Day Les,

 

Yes still following the discussions on the forum.....always interesting.  

I'm still rebuilding the 718 Pinzgauer....."may" go to the factory in Austria in August so there is the possibility of getting some Syncro pics, info, etc which I'II pass on if I do.  

Peter.

___

> Roger Bell <bellrmit@yahoo.com.au> wrote:
>
>

> Les-
> 1.It had a Sachs Dynastart, which was a flywheel alternator. When the
> engine was running, it provided electric power to the vehicle. To start
> the engine, battery power was applied to the alternator.
> ����Didn't the Haflinger also����have a similar starter/dynamo arrangement?

So did the Honda Zot.

Les, driving the Messerschmitt, did you notice the fishtailing when going ‘fast’  (80 to 100 kmh)? The follow up model had twin rear wheels and (I believe) a 400 cc twin engine top speed was 135 km/h!!

Your 250 BM, has got the Swing front suspension or the standard telescopic front end ?  The first crossing by light plane was accomplished by using a 500 cc BMW engine . Ferdinand Porsche designed

the motorbike  when being employed by Daimler Benz. His bosses were not impressed and gave the design to BMW.

Hartmut

From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Les Harris
Sent: Sunday, 24 June 2012 10:34 AM
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Alan Turing

 

 

Roger,

I have driven both of these vehicles.  The Messerschmitt had a very unusual feature – it did not have reverse gear!!  In fact, it didn’t have a starter motor as such.  It had a Sachs Dynastart, which was a flywheel alternator.  When the engine was running, it provided electric power to the vehicle.  To start the engine, battery power was applied to the alternator. 

To reverse the vehicle, the driver flipped a switch, which stopped the engine, reversed the polarity of the alternator and restarted the engine – running backwards!  One then had four reverse speeds and I actually saw one being driven at about 30MPH along Epping Road – in reverse!

The BMW Isetta was a very practical vehicle, powered by the 250cc single cylinder BMW motorcycle engine and it got along quite smartly in traffic.  For about a year, I drove a Goggo Dart and that thing went like a hairy goat in traffic.  From memory, it was only a 400cc twin two stroke engine but, because of the very light weight, nothing could keep up with it up to about 40MPH.  Manoeuvreability was quite good and it was a lot of fun to drive.

Speaking of the 250 BMW motorcycle, I own a 1954 model which I bought in about 1956 with 11,000 on the clock.  It now has a grand total of 22,000 miles on the clock! 

Les


From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Roger Bell
Sent: 24 June 2012 00:21
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Alan Turing

 

 

. . . photographed (poorly because of the light and reflections) these now collector piece BMW and Messerschmitt vehicles which were very popular in Britain in the 50's. I sometimes wonder if their time could come again as city cars with updated pollution free power units and better passenger protection.

Your posting obviously triggered many memories for me. Thanks

Roger

Melbourne

The follow up model had twin rear wheels and (I
> believe) a 400 cc twin engine top speed was 135 km/h!!
>

That was the TG400 (Tiger) which is much more collectable than the KR200.