electrolisis

Les and others,
Has anyone experienced any electrolisis on engine parts or radiator when using stainless steel cooling pipes,or is this not an issue.
I have been told by one person that stainless will cause your radiator to corrode away.What do you know?Thanks.

Ben,

I haven’t heard of this being a problem.  Electrolysis is at its worst when two dissimilar metals are in contact.  This is a big problem in ships and sacrificial anodes (usually zinc) are used to dodge the problem.  I would not expect this to be a problem with the Syncro but monitoring the fitting would be good insurance. 

Because most metal parts in the cooling system are connected with rubber sleeves, any electrolysis would first start at the end of the fitting, which is covered by the rubber sleeve.  The downside of monitoring is that sleeves would have to be removed, coolant would be lost and would need replenishment.

At the moment, I don’t know what material the Syncro radiator is made from.  Does anyone know?

Ben Tan or Scott Daniel, if you are on line, have you encountered this (electrolysis) in the US?

Les


From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com [mailto: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of bencroft96
Sent: 25 May 2010 08:25
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Syncro_T3_Australia] electrolysis

Les and others,
Has anyone experienced any electrolisis on engine parts or radiator when using stainless steel cooling pipes, or is this not an issue.
I have been told by one person that stainless will cause your radiator to corrode away.What do you know?Thanks.

Mine seems OK - 15 years on with stainless steel pipes in variaous spots.
 
 
Skot
 
----- Original Message -----
From: bencroft96
Sent: Tuesday, May 25, 2010 8:24 AM
Subject: [Syncro_T3_Australia] electrolisis

 

Les and others,
Has anyone experienced any electrolisis on engine parts or radiator when using stainless steel cooling pipes,or is this not an issue.
I have been told by one person that stainless will cause your radiator to corrode away.What do you know?Thanks.

Hi Les,

I haven't anyone complain nor have I seem incidences of electrolysis attributable to stainless steel pipes. There's a lot of speculation going around the US forums but nobody has produced any empirical evidence either direction.

IMO, there hasn't been enough stainless pipes in service long enough to make electrolysis an issue even if it was a factor.

I have seen ample evidence of electrolysis on heads on vehicles with stock plastic pipes. Obviously, other components are causing this problem. Don't be surprised if people start blaming stainless steel pipes for this phenomenon later down the line. Since the plastic pipes are NLA, we don't seem to have much of a choice as far as replacements go. I'd rather have SS rather than big rubber hoses which tend to fail catastrophically.

Hoping to answer your radiator question. Every Syncro & 2wd radiator I have ever seen has been aluminium w/ plastic tanks. Even replacement ones by Behr are of the same construction. The exception are the early diesel T3's which had brass radiators with brass tanks. I've never seen these brass radiators any petrol fueled T3 nor were they in my post '88 factory turbodiesel T3 Syncros.

I don't have as much hands on experience as Scott Foss who runs a VW repair shop. However, I have owned over 30 T3's of which at least a dozen were Syncros. I am also a frequent visitor to a local which services a half dozen T3's every day (5 days a week). I see at least 50% of all the T3's repaired there and have inspected a number of engines for signs of corrosion. One thing I noticed is although the later head castings made by AMC still suffers from pitting in the combustion area. However, it appears they are of an alloy less prone to corrosion than the original VW heads. For the record, there appeared to be a high valve failure rate in the early AMC heads but not on the newer ones. 



Regards,

BenT 
Sent from my radiator 

On May 25, 2010, at 8:13 PM, "Les Harris" <leslieharris@optusnet.com.au> wrote:

Ben,

I haven’t heard of this being a problem.  Electrolysis is at its worst when two dissimilar metals are in contact.  This is a big problem in ships and sacrificial anodes (usually zinc) are used to dodge the problem.  I would not expect this to be a problem with the Syncro but monitoring the fitting would be good insurance. 

Because most metal parts in the cooling system are connected with rubber sleeves, any electrolysis would first start at the end of the fitting, which is covered by the rubber sleeve.  The downside of monitoring is that sleeves would have to be removed, coolant would be lost and would need replenishment.

At the moment, I don’t know what material the Syncro radiator is made from.  Does anyone know?

Ben Tan or Scott Daniel, if you are on line, have you encountered this (electrolysis) in the US?

Les


Electrolysis is at its worst when
> two dissimilar metals are in contact.

........or when liquids are involved.

Look at electroplating. There is no contact there.

Stainless and aluminium are not a good combination. Whether it will affect a syncro in real life, who knows? It may take 200 years before it dissolves your radiator.

Phill,

This is true but electroplating involves substantial introduced electric currents, whilst the electrolysis we are talking about here are the potential currents between dissimilar metals and not relevant to the original question.

Les


From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com [mailto: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of plander@optusnet.com.au
Sent: 27 May 2010 07:44
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: RE: [Syncro_T3_Australia] electrolysis

 

 Electrolysis is at its worst when

> two dissimilar metals are in contact.

........or when liquids are involved.

Look at electroplating. There is no contact there.

Stainless and aluminium are not a good combination. Whether it will affect a syncro in real life, who knows? It may take 200 years before it dissolves your radiator.

Same principle but very much slower. (A lot slower)



> Les Harris <leslieharris@optusnet.com.au> wrote:
>
> Phill,
>
> This is true but electroplating involves substantial introduced electric
> currents, whilst the electrolysis we are talking about here are the
> potential currents between dissimilar metals and not relevant to the
> original question.
>
> Les
>
> _____
>
> From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
> [mailto:Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
> plander@optusnet.com.au
> Sent: 27 May 2010 07:44
> To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
> Subject: Re: RE: [Syncro_T3_Australia] electrolysis
>
>
>
> Electrolysis is at its worst when
> > two dissimilar metals are in contact.
>
> ........or when liquids are involved.
>
> Look at electroplating. There is no contact there.
>
> Stainless and aluminium are not a good combination. Whether it will
> affect a
> syncro in real life, who knows? It may take 200 years before it
> dissolves
> your radiator.
Why the need for stainless? If you're worried about electrolysis why not use aluminium tubing. It's lighter, cheaper and far closer on the electrochemical series to any aluminium alloy than stainess steel is. Has anybody used aluminium?

Tom

--- In Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com, plander@... wrote:
>
> Same principle but very much slower. (A lot slower)
>
>
>
> > Les Harris <leslieharris@...> wrote:
> >
> > Phill,
> >
> > This is true but electroplating involves substantial introduced electric
> > currents, whilst the electrolysis we are talking about here are the
> > potential currents between dissimilar metals and not relevant to the
> > original question.
> >
> > Les
> >
> > _____
> >
> > From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
> > [mailto:Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
> > plander@...
> > Sent: 27 May 2010 07:44
> > To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
> > Subject: Re: RE: [Syncro_T3_Australia] electrolysis
> >
> >
> >
> > Electrolysis is at its worst when
> > > two dissimilar metals are in contact.
> >
> > ........or when liquids are involved.
> >
> > Look at electroplating. There is no contact there.
> >
> > Stainless and aluminium are not a good combination. Whether it will
> > affect a
> > syncro in real life, who knows? It may take 200 years before it
> > dissolves
> > your radiator.
>
Hi guys, i have done extensive research in this area, firstly your radiator will NOT corrode away, however your cylinder heads will, as we all know the heads on boxer engines ARE suseptable to extensive corrosion, and by fitting stainless pipes this will speed up the corrosion process.
the simple solution is to fit small sacrificial anodes inside the coolant system. the simplest way is to tie a copper wire (or solder) to a zinc bolt, place the bolt in the coolat pipe as close to the head as possible and then earth the other end of the wire, back to the head, the block or the body.
the reason the heads corrode and not the rad is because there are dissimilar metals in close proximity to the heads, the stainless pipes will encourage this.
there is another solution, and that would be to check the coolant regularly and keep the PH at neutarl, when coolant becomes old and worn its acidity rises! coolant should be changed every 2-3years according to manufacturers specs, and this is why.
the reason aluminium is not used for pipes is they tend to crack when bent into shape stainless is an easier option, it will take a huge amount of abuse before real damage occours.
cheers jon

Jon,

Thanks for this information; this is very valuable.  Do you have any pictures of such an installation?  Have you conducted any Ph measurements or do you have further information?  This could be the simplest way to defeat electrolysis.

Les


From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com [mailto: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of kombijon
Sent: 27 May 2010 16:59
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Re: electrolisis

Hi guys, i have done extensive research in this area, firstly your radiator will NOT corrode away, however your cylinder heads will, as we all know the heads on boxer engines ARE suseptable to extensive corrosion, and by fitting stainless pipes this will speed up the corrosion process.
The simple solution is to fit small sacrificial anodes inside the coolant system. the simplest way is to tie a copper wire (or solder) to a zinc bolt, place the bolt in the coolat pipe as close to the head as possible and then earth the other end of the wire, back to the head, the block or the body.
the reason the heads corrode and not the rad is because there are dissimilar metals in close proximity to the heads, the stainless pipes will encourage this.
There is another solution, and that would be to check the coolant regularly and keep the PH at neutarl, when coolant becomes old and worn its acidity rises! coolant should be changed every 2-3years according to manufacturers specs, and this is why.
the reason aluminium is not used for pipes is they tend to crack when bent into shape stainless is an easier option, it will take a huge amount of abuse before real damage occours.
cheers jon

Hey Jon, thanks for the input. I have been watching your 16" rebuild closely - love it. I have been wanting to ask you a question I suspect you know the anwser to. I have a 14" syncro which I want to raise, will 2wd standard springs work? I have read that heavy duty doka springs are the go but not exactly common in Aus. I have a heavy winch/bracket and am worried the standard spring rate may be softer than standard syncro. Can't wait to see that diesel lump in your twin cab. Tia Greg

--- On Thu, 27/5/10, kombijon <kombijon@yahoo.com.au> wrote:

From: kombijon <kombijon@yahoo.com.au>
Subject: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Re: electrolisis
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Received: Thursday, 27 May, 2010, 4:59 PM

 

Hi guys, i have done extensive research in this area, firstly your radiator will NOT corrode away, however your cylinder heads will, as we all know the heads on boxer engines ARE suseptable to extensive corrosion, and by fitting stainless pipes this will speed up the corrosion process.
the simple solution is to fit small sacrificial anodes inside the coolant system. the simplest way is to tie a copper wire (or solder) to a zinc bolt, place the bolt in the coolat pipe as close to the head as possible and then earth the other end of the wire, back to the head, the block or the body.
the reason the heads corrode and not the rad is because there are dissimilar metals in close proximity to the heads, the stainless pipes will encourage this.
there is another solution, and that would be to check the coolant regularly and keep the PH at neutarl, when coolant becomes old and worn its acidity rises! coolant should be changed every 2-3years according to manufacturers specs, and this is why.
the reason aluminium is not used for pipes is they tend to crack when bent into shape stainless is an easier option, it will take a huge amount of abuse before real damage occours.
cheers jon


 
Greg,

I going to throw in my 2 cents here. I own a Syncro 16 Doka. There is no difference between the springs on the 16" Syncros or the 14". There is also no difference between springs on vans or dokas or sinkas for that matter. 

You can use 2wd springs to raise the Syncro a little. Tallest are from the 1985 models. I recently removed some from a 1984 T3 and compared them to 87-91 Carat springs (all these are 2wd). They Carat springs were about 1.5" shorter. Unfortunately, I did not have a Syncro spring handy for comparison. I  did not get an opportunity to check on the rear springs yet.

If anyone is interested, I will be selling a full set of GoWesty springs for US$425 plus shipping. That's a good bit less than their list price. If any of you have been reading the (worldwide) Syncro forum, you may have read that I decided against installing the GW springs on my relatively light Syncro Doka. Unladen weight is nearly 2,000 lbs. less than my friend's fully accessorized Syncro Westfalia. The GW springs are deemed too stiff for a light weight Syncro.


Regards,

BenT
Sent from my mobile device 

On May 27, 2010, at 2:32 AM, greg esposito <gregespo73@yahoo.com> wrote:

Hey Jon, thanks for the input. I have been watching your 16" rebuild closely - love it. I have been wanting to ask you a question I suspect you know the anwser to. I have a 14" syncro which I want to raise, will 2wd standard springs work? I have read that heavy duty doka springs are the go but not exactly common in Aus. I have a heavy winch/bracket and am worried the standard spring rate may be softer than standard syncro. Can't wait to see that diesel lump in your twin cab. Tia Greg

--- On Thu, 27/5/10, kombijon <kombijon@yahoo.com.au> wrote:

From: kombijon <kombijon@yahoo.com.au>
Subject: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Re: electrolisis
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Received: Thursday, 27 May, 2010, 4:59 PM

 

Hi guys, i have done extensive research in this area, firstly your radiator will NOT corrode away, however your cylinder heads will, as we all know the heads on boxer engines ARE suseptable to extensive corrosion, and by fitting stainless pipes this will speed up the corrosion process.
the simple solution is to fit small sacrificial anodes inside the coolant system. the simplest way is to tie a copper wire (or solder) to a zinc bolt, place the bolt in the coolat pipe as close to the head as possible and then earth the other end of the wire, back to the head, the block or the body.
the reason the heads corrode and not the rad is because there are dissimilar metals in close proximity to the heads, the stainless pipes will encourage this.
there is another solution, and that would be to check the coolant regularly and keep the PH at neutarl, when coolant becomes old and worn its acidity rises! coolant should be changed every 2-3years according to manufacturers specs, and this is why.
the reason aluminium is not used for pipes is they tend to crack when bent into shape stainless is an easier option, it will take a huge amount of abuse before real damage occours.
cheers jon


 
Ben, Sorry but 2wd springs are not all the same. Carats are lower from the factory. There was also heavy duty springs available as an option on dokas, they have green paint dots.
Greg
--- On Thu, 27/5/10, BenT Syncro <syncro@gmail.com> wrote:

From: BenT Syncro <syncro@gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Re: electrolisis
To: "Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com" <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
Cc: "gregespo73@yahoo.com" <gregespo73@yahoo.com>
Received: Thursday, 27 May, 2010, 8:01 PM

 
Greg,

I going to throw in my 2 cents here. I own a Syncro 16 Doka. There is no difference between the springs on the 16" Syncros or the 14". There is also no difference between springs on vans or dokas or sinkas for that matter. 

You can use 2wd springs to raise the Syncro a little. Tallest are from the 1985 models. I recently removed some from a 1984 T3 and compared them to 87-91 Carat springs (all these are 2wd). They Carat springs were about 1.5" shorter. Unfortunately, I did not have a Syncro spring handy for comparison. I  did not get an opportunity to check on the rear springs yet.

If anyone is interested, I will be selling a full set of GoWesty springs for US$425 plus shipping. That's a good bit less than their list price. If any of you have been reading the (worldwide) Syncro forum, you may have read that I decided against installing the GW springs on my relatively light Syncro Doka. Unladen weight is nearly 2,000 lbs. less than my friend's fully accessorized Syncro Westfalia. The GW springs are deemed too stiff for a light weight Syncro.


Regards,

BenT
Sent from my mobile device 

On May 27, 2010, at 2:32 AM, greg esposito <gregespo73@yahoo. com> wrote:

Hey Jon, thanks for the input. I have been watching your 16" rebuild closely - love it. I have been wanting to ask you a question I suspect you know the anwser to. I have a 14" syncro which I want to raise, will 2wd standard springs work? I have read that heavy duty doka springs are the go but not exactly common in Aus. I have a heavy winch/bracket and am worried the standard spring rate may be softer than standard syncro. Can't wait to see that diesel lump in your twin cab. Tia Greg

--- On Thu, 27/5/10, kombijon <kombijon@yahoo. com.au> wrote:

From: kombijon <kombijon@yahoo. com.au>
Subject: [Syncro_T3_Australi a] Re: electrolisis
To: Syncro_T3_Australia @yahoogroups. com
Received: Thursday, 27 May, 2010, 4:59 PM

 

Hi guys, i have done extensive research in this area, firstly your radiator will NOT corrode away, however your cylinder heads will, as we all know the heads on boxer engines ARE suseptable to extensive corrosion, and by fitting stainless pipes this will speed up the corrosion process.
the simple solution is to fit small sacrificial anodes inside the coolant system. the simplest way is to tie a copper wire (or solder) to a zinc bolt, place the bolt in the coolat pipe as close to the head as possible and then earth the other end of the wire, back to the head, the block or the body.
the reason the heads corrode and not the rad is because there are dissimilar metals in close proximity to the heads, the stainless pipes will encourage this.
there is another solution, and that would be to check the coolant regularly and keep the PH at neutarl, when coolant becomes old and worn its acidity rises! coolant should be changed every 2-3years according to manufacturers specs, and this is why.
the reason aluminium is not used for pipes is they tend to crack when bent into shape stainless is an easier option, it will take a huge amount of abuse before real damage occours.
cheers jon


 

 
Steve Muller told me that although the 2WD springs are taller, that they are much softer than the syncro springs.


> greg esposito <gregespo73@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> Ben, Sorry but 2wd springs are not all the same. Carats are lower from
> the factory. There was also heavy duty springs available as an option on
> dokas, they have green paint dots.
> Greg
> --- On Thu, 27/5/10, BenT Syncro <syncro@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
> From: BenT Syncro <syncro@gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Re: electrolisis
> To: "Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com"
> <Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com>
> Cc: "gregespo73@yahoo.com" <gregespo73@yahoo.com>
> Received: Thursday, 27 May, 2010, 8:01 PM
>
>
> ����
>
>
>
>
> Greg,
>
>
> I going to throw in my 2 cents here. I own a Syncro 16 Doka. There is no
> difference between the springs on the 16" Syncros or the 14". There is
> also no difference between springs on vans or dokas or sinkas for that
> matter.����
>
>
> You can use 2wd springs to raise the Syncro a little. Tallest are from
> the 1985 models. I recently removed some from a 1984 T3 and compared
> them to 87-91 Carat springs (all these are 2wd). They Carat springs were
> about 1.5" shorter. Unfortunately, I did not have a Syncro spring handy
> for comparison. I ����did not get an opportunity to check on the rear
> springs yet.
>
>
> If anyone is interested, I will be selling a full set of GoWesty springs
> for US$425 plus shipping. That's a good bit less than their list price.
> If any of you have been reading the (worldwide) Syncro forum, you may
> have read that I decided against installing the GW springs on my
> relatively light Syncro Doka. Unladen weight is nearly 2,000 lbs. less
> than my friend's fully accessorized Syncro Westfalia. The GW springs are
> deemed too stiff for a light weight Syncro.
>
>
>
>
> Regards,
>
>
> BenT
> Sent from my����mobile device����
>
> On May 27, 2010, at 2:32 AM, greg esposito <gregespo73@yahoo. com>
> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Hey Jon, thanks for the input. I have been watching your 16" rebuild
> closely - love it. I have been wanting to ask you a question I suspect
> you know the anwser to. I have a 14" syncro which I want to raise, will
> 2wd standard springs work? I have����read that heavy duty doka springs are
> the go but not exactly common in Aus. I have a heavy winch/bracket and
> am worried the standard spring rate may be softer than standard syncro.
> Can't wait to see that diesel lump in your twin cab. Tia Greg
>
> --- On Thu, 27/5/10, kombijon <kombijon@yahoo. com.au> wrote:
>
>
> From: kombijon <kombijon@yahoo. com.au>
> Subject: [Syncro_T3_Australi a] Re: electrolisis
> To: Syncro_T3_Australia @yahoogroups. com
> Received: Thursday, 27 May, 2010, 4:59 PM
>
>
> ����
>
>
> Hi guys, i have done extensive research in this area, firstly your
> radiator will NOT corrode away, however your cylinder heads will, as we
> all know the heads on boxer engines ARE suseptable to extensive
> corrosion, and by fitting stainless pipes this will speed up the
> corrosion process.
> the simple solution is to fit small sacrificial anodes inside the
> coolant system. the simplest way is to tie a copper wire (or solder) to
> a zinc bolt, place the bolt in the coolat pipe as close to the head as
> possible and then earth the other end of the wire, back to the head, the
> block or the body.
> the reason the heads corrode and not the rad is because there are
> dissimilar metals in close proximity to the heads, the stainless pipes
> will encourage this.
> there is another solution, and that would be to check the coolant
> regularly and keep the PH at neutarl, when coolant becomes old and worn
> its acidity rises! coolant should be changed every 2-3years according to
> manufacturers specs, and this is why.
> the reason aluminium is not used for pipes is they tend to crack when
> bent into shape stainless is an easier option, it will take a huge
> amount of abuse before real damage occours.
> cheers jon
>
>
> ����
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
i posted a bloody long e-mail explaining everything i know about springs and electrolosis, and it seems to have got lost in cyberspace!!
 
electrolosis, theres a few threads on the samba regarding the fitting of stainless pipes, as audi 5cyl lumps dont grow on trees round here i need to preserve mine for as long as possible!
boats suffer quite badly and i've been pointed to a chandlers who can supply small anodes that fit inside cooling systems, although a small zinc bolt will do the same trick!
 
SPRINGS, FRONT>>>>2wd are alot longer than syncro springs, no drive shafts to interfere. the spring rating for both are the same, fitting 2wd springs will deff lift your syncro, but beware that your struts will bottom out when the wheel leaves the ground. they are not that easy to fit but they give a similar ride feel to standard syncro springs
REAR>>>>> my 16" rear springs were thicker and longer than standard 14" springs i had new springs made, same thickness, rating etc exept i had 30mm longer (same as my fronts) heavy duty springs will also result in a harder ride, i kept my springs the same rating as comfort is essential on long journeys!

there are pics on my build blog in the kombiclub forum. i';ll put pics on here later.
cheers jon

 

Jon,

Your post on electrolysis came through and I posted an answer.

Les

 


From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com [mailto: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of jon hornby
Sent: 27 May 2010 21:05
To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Syncro_T3_Australia] Re: electrolisis/ springs

 

 

So it doesnt seem to be an issue then.

--- In Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com, BenT Syncro <syncro@...> wrote:
>
> Hi Les,
>
> I haven't anyone complain nor have I seem incidences of electrolysis
> attributable to stainless steel pipes. There's a lot of speculation
> going around the US forums but nobody has produced any empirical
> evidence either direction.
>
> IMO, there hasn't been enough stainless pipes in service long enough
> to make electrolysis an issue even if it was a factor.
>
> I have seen ample evidence of electrolysis on heads on vehicles with
> stock plastic pipes. Obviously, other components are causing this
> problem. Don't be surprised if people start blaming stainless steel
> pipes for this phenomenon later down the line. Since the plastic pipes
> are NLA, we don't seem to have much of a choice as far as replacements
> go. I'd rather have SS rather than big rubber hoses which tend to fail
> catastrophically.
>
> Hoping to answer your radiator question. Every Syncro & 2wd radiator I
> have ever seen has been aluminium w/ plastic tanks. Even replacement
> ones by Behr are of the same construction. The exception are the early
> diesel T3's which had brass radiators with brass tanks. I've never
> seen these brass radiators any petrol fueled T3 nor were they in my
> post '88 factory turbodiesel T3 Syncros.
>
> I don't have as much hands on experience as Scott Foss who runs a VW
> repair shop. However, I have owned over 30 T3's of which at least a
> dozen were Syncros. I am also a frequent visitor to a local which
> services a half dozen T3's every day (5 days a week). I see at least
> 50% of all the T3's repaired there and have inspected a number of
> engines for signs of corrosion. One thing I noticed is although the
> later head castings made by AMC still suffers from pitting in the
> combustion area. However, it appears they are of an alloy less prone
> to corrosion than the original VW heads. For the record, there
> appeared to be a high valve failure rate in the early AMC heads but
> not on the newer ones.
>
>
>
> Regards,
>
> BenT
> Sent from my radiator
>
> On May 25, 2010, at 8:13 PM, "Les Harris"
> <leslieharris@...> wrote:
>
> >
> >
> > Ben,
> > I haven’t heard of this being a problem. Electrolysis is at its wor
> > st when two dissimilar metals are in contact. This is a big problem
> > in ships and sacrificial anodes (usually zinc) are used to dodge th
> > e problem. I would not expect this to be a problem with the Syncro
> > but monitoring the fitting would be good insurance.
> > Because most metal parts in the cooling system are connected with
> > rubber sleeves, any electrolysis would first start at the end of the
> > fitting, which is covered by the rubber sleeve. The downside of
> > monitoring is that sleeves would have to be removed, coolant would
> > be lost and would need replenishment.
> > At the moment, I don’t know what material the Syncro radiator is mad
> > e from. Does anyone know?
> > Ben Tan or Scott Daniel, if you are on line, have you encountered
> > this (electrolysis) in the US?
> > Les
> >
> >
>
Hey Tom,Hows the decoupler?Do you know anyone who does aluminium tube fabrication?

--- In Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com, "oldgreywhiskers" <thomashanson@...> wrote:
>
> Why the need for stainless? If you're worried about electrolysis why not use aluminium tubing. It's lighter, cheaper and far closer on the electrochemical series to any aluminium alloy than stainess steel is. Has anybody used aluminium?
>
> Tom
>
> --- In Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com, plander@ wrote:
> >
> > Same principle but very much slower. (A lot slower)
> >
> >
> >
> > > Les Harris <leslieharris@> wrote:
> > >
> > > Phill,
> > >
> > > This is true but electroplating involves substantial introduced electric
> > > currents, whilst the electrolysis we are talking about here are the
> > > potential currents between dissimilar metals and not relevant to the
> > > original question.
> > >
> > > Les
> > >
> > > _____
> > >
> > > From: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
> > > [mailto:Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
> > > plander@
> > > Sent: 27 May 2010 07:44
> > > To: Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com
> > > Subject: Re: RE: [Syncro_T3_Australia] electrolysis
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Electrolysis is at its worst when
> > > > two dissimilar metals are in contact.
> > >
> > > ........or when liquids are involved.
> > >
> > > Look at electroplating. There is no contact there.
> > >
> > > Stainless and aluminium are not a good combination. Whether it will
> > > affect a
> > > syncro in real life, who knows? It may take 200 years before it
> > > dissolves
> > > your radiator.
> >
>
Kombijon,Thats genious.Thankyou.

--- In Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com, "kombijon" <kombijon@...> wrote:
>
>
> Hi guys, i have done extensive research in this area, firstly your radiator will NOT corrode away, however your cylinder heads will, as we all know the heads on boxer engines ARE suseptable to extensive corrosion, and by fitting stainless pipes this will speed up the corrosion process.
> the simple solution is to fit small sacrificial anodes inside the coolant system. the simplest way is to tie a copper wire (or solder) to a zinc bolt, place the bolt in the coolat pipe as close to the head as possible and then earth the other end of the wire, back to the head, the block or the body.
> the reason the heads corrode and not the rad is because there are dissimilar metals in close proximity to the heads, the stainless pipes will encourage this.
> there is another solution, and that would be to check the coolant regularly and keep the PH at neutarl, when coolant becomes old and worn its acidity rises! coolant should be changed every 2-3years according to manufacturers specs, and this is why.
> the reason aluminium is not used for pipes is they tend to crack when bent into shape stainless is an easier option, it will take a huge amount of abuse before real damage occours.
> cheers jon
>
Les,I also have lost some posts to cyberspace.Also two recent post didnt show up on the forum till two days later??

--- In Syncro_T3_Australia@yahoogroups.com, jon hornby <kombijon@...> wrote:
>
> i posted a bloody long e-mail explaining everything i know about springs and electrolosis, and it seems to have got lost in cyberspace!!
>
> electrolosis, theres a few threads on the samba regarding the fitting of stainless pipes, as audi 5cyl lumps dont grow on trees round here i need to preserve mine for as long as possible!
> boats suffer quite badly and i've been pointed to a chandlers who can supply small anodes that fit inside cooling systems, although a small zinc bolt will do the same trick!
>
> SPRINGS, FRONT>>>>2wd are alot longer than syncro springs, no drive shafts to interfere. the spring rating for both are the same, fitting 2wd springs will deff lift your syncro, but beware that your struts will bottom out when the wheel leaves the ground. they are not that easy to fit but they give a similar ride feel to standard syncro springs
> REAR>>>>> my 16" rear springs were thicker and longer than standard 14" springs i had new springs made, same thickness, rating etc exept i had 30mm longer (same as my fronts) heavy duty springs will also result in a harder ride, i kept my springs the same rating as comfort is essential on long journeys!
>
> there are pics on my build blog in the kombiclub forum. i';ll put pics on here later.
> cheers jon
>